Sort by:

Mike Park Ltd

DREWITT, F Dawtrey, The Life of Edward Jenner naturalist and discoverer of vaccination

DREWITT, F. Dawtrey The Life of Edward Jenner - naturalist and discoverer of vaccination , London: Longmans, Green & Co, 1933.

Illustrated, small 8vo, pp xii, 151, slightly age-toned, a little foxing, half-title and last page more heavily foxed, cloth slightly worn and marked. With the signature of the botanist C.T. Prime on the front endpaper. [The scarce enlarged edition.] {Edward Anthony Jenner, 1749 - 1823 was an English scientist who studied his natural surroundings in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Jenner is widely credited as the pioneer of smallpox vaccine, and is sometimes referred to as the "Father of Immunology"; his works have been said to have "saved more lives than the work of any other man". Ronald Hopkins states: "Jenner's unique contribution was not that he inoculated a few persons with cowpox, but that he then proved they were immune to smallpox. Moreover, he demonstrated that the protective cowpox could be effectively inoculated from person to person, not just directly from cattle. In addition he tested his theory on a series of 23 subjects. This aspect of his research method increased the validity of his evidence. In 1803 in London he became involved with the Jennerian Institution, a society concerned with promoting vaccination to eradicate smallpox. In 1808, with government aid, this society became the National Vaccine Establishment. Jenner became a member of the Medical and Chirurgical Society on its foundation in 1805, and subsequently presented to them a number of papers. This is now the Royal Society of Medicine. In 1806, he was elected a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Returning to London in 1811 he observed a significant number of cases of smallpox after vaccination occurring. He found that in these cases the severity of the illness was notably diminished by the previous vaccination. In 1821 he was appointed Physician Extraordinary to King George IV, a considerable national honour, and was made Mayor of Berkeley and Justice of the Peace. He continued his interests in natural history. In 1823, the last year of his life, he presented his Observations on the Migration of Birds to the Royal Society. Jenner was found in a state of apoplexy on 25 January 1823, with his right side paralysed. He never fully recovered, and eventually died of an apparent stroke (he had suffered a previous stroke) on 26 January 1823, aged 73. He was survived by one son and one daughter, his elder son having died of tuberculosis at the age of 21.} (Book ref. 006395 )  £ 40.00

The payment methods accepted by the seller, Mike Park Ltd , are shown in the right-hand column.


 
 
Offered for sale by: Mike Park Ltd
Contact: Mike Park
Address: 351, Sutton Common Road,
Sutton,
Surrey,
SM3 9HZ
UK
Phone: 02086417796
Fax: 02086413330
Email:
Website:
Returns: All our books are accurately described. Please contact us immediately if you are unhappy with a book and we can make arrangements for a ret
Shipping: Postage within UK will be charged at basic rates. Please let us know if you require express delivery. Postage abroad will be charged at cost
Payment: Credit cards (Visa, Mastercard). PayPal. Cash.
Specialities: Gardening, botany,landscape design, all branches of natural history.
Status: Bookdealer
View all this seller's books