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JEVONS (William Stanley): Pure Logic and Other Minor Works.., edited by Robert Adamson and Harriet A. Jevons, with a Preface by Professor Adamson,
First Edition, xxiii, 299pp., complete with 4 plates, tall 8vo, a fine copy in original orange/red cloth, London, Macmillan, 1890.* One of Jevons's rarest works despite being late in the canon. It includes four chapters on the Theory of Logic one of which is Jevons's 1870 article on his "logical piano - a logic machine - a sort of motional form of the later diagrammatic scheme of John Venn. Jevons' 'logical piano' .. was built for him by a Salford clockmaker. It resembled a small upright piano, with twenty-one keys for classes and operations in an equational logic. Four terms, A, B, C, and D, with their negations, in binary combinations, were displayed in slots in front and in back of the piano; and the mechanism allowed for classification, retention, or rejection, depending upon what the player fed in via the keyboard. The keyboard was arranged in an equational form, with all eight terms on both left and right and a 'copula' key between them. The remaining four keys were, on the extreme left, 'finis' (clearance) and the inclusive 'or', and, on the extreme right, 'full stop' (output) and the inclusive 'or again.' In all 216 (65,536) logical selections were possible. "The machine earned much acclaim. .. Although its principal value was as an aid to the teaching of the new logic of classes and propositions, it actually solved problems with superhuman speed and accuracy, and some of its features can be traced in modern computer designs" (DSB. 7: 105). Five further essays are grouped under the general title of "John Stuart Mill's Philosophy Tested." Of the latter, the editors note that Jevons "attached much weight to his critical examination of J.S. Mill's doctrines, and the labour bestowed on it played a large part in the last ten or twelve years of his life." Includes the 1864 book 'Pure Logic, or the Logic of Quality Apart from Quantity: with Remarks on Boole's System and on the Relation of Logic and Mathematics', which is one of Jevons's rarest publications and one to which he himself attached high importance. The principle of sameness forms the basis of this, his first book on logic which he described in the following terms: "The original principle of this theory is that sameness is the one great relation which the mind deals in when constructing science". Of the need for simplification in logic Jevons was convinced: he found the subject in as confused a state as political economy before he set out to "re-establish the science on a sensible basis". He therefore aimed to simplify logical theory as far as possible, and his important modifications on Boole's system (which are still accepted today) were to this end. He showed, for example, that the Boolean operations for subtraction and division were superfluous: he redefined the symbol + to mean 'either one, or the other, or both'. Jevons went on to champion the principles of Boole's system against that of Mill, writing three articles against Mill's system. (Book ref. 20520)   £620.00
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ENGELS (Frederick): The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844, with [new] Preface Written in 1892,
translated by Florence Kelley Wischenewetzky, first London edition, xix, 298, [2], + 4pp advertisements, octavo, a very good clean copy in original black lettered red cloth, London, Swan Sonnenschein, 1892. * The Condition of the Working Class is Engels best-known work and in many ways still the best study of the working class in Victorian England. It was also Engels's first book, written during his stay in Manchester from 1842 to 1844. Manchester was then at the very heart of the Industrial Revolution and Engels compiled his study from his own observations and detailed contemporary reports. The fluency of his writing, the personal nature of his insights, and his talent for mordant satire combine to make this account of the life of the victims of early industrial change into a classic - a historical study that parallels and complements the fictional works of the time by such writers as Gaskell and Dickens. What Cobbett had done for agricultural poverty in his Rural Rides, Engels did - and more - in this work on the plight of the industrial workers in the England of the early 1840s. Engels paints an unforgettable picture of daily life in the new industrial towns, and for miners and agricultural workers in a savage indictment of the greed of the bourgeoisie. His later preface, written for this first English edition of 1892 brought the story up-to-date in the light of forty years' further reflection. (Book ref. 20521)   £100.00
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KEYNES (John Maynard): Revision of the Treaty, being a Sequel to The Economic Consequences of the Peace,
First Edition, 8vo, pp. 223, [1] blank + 6 pp. advertisements, a very good copy in the original blue publisher's cloth, London, Macmillan, 1922. A Revision of the Treaty (1922) is Keynes's sequel to and revision of his Economic Consequences of the Peace (1919). "It has the incisive and lively style of the earlier book, and makes excellent reading. But it was more strictly addressed to the economic issue and could not have as wide a public as the book which analysed the inner motives of Wilson and Clemenceau" (Harrod). In June 1921, Keynes had proposed to his American publisher Harcourt 'a final revised edition' of The Economic Consequences of the Peace, to include a new introduction of 40 pages, and footnotes or appendices dealing with new criticisms and recent events. Harcourt suggested rather that a new book should be made out of the new material, on the grounds that the public would not read a revision but merely note the changes from reviews... Moggridge A 4.1.1. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 20517)   £120.00
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MALTHUS (Thomas Robert); M'CULLOCH (J. R.); PLACE (Francis) (witnesses, with others); HUME (Joseph, Chairman):: Six Reports from the Select Committee on Artizans and Machinery, Ordered by the House of Commons to be Printed, 1824
620pp large thick folio, very fine copy in buckram, top edge gilt, with the bookplate of the Public Record Office, [London, House of Commons], and with the specially printed provenance leaf reading: "This Book is to be Preserved in the Office of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty's Treasury", 1824. * At the instigation of Francis Place, this Parliamentary Select Committee was appointed in the House of Commons in 1824 to study the issues of emigration of artisans, exportation of tools and machinery and the Combination Laws ("so far as relates to the Combination of Workmen, and others, to raise wages, or to regulate their wages and hours of working."). The laws forbidding combinations (unions) had come into existence during the eighteenth century. The effort to repeal these statutes was initiated by Joseph Hume, a free trade advocate. Hume's position was that the House should repeal every law that constricted the free movement of labour. Malthus gave evidence in the 6th Report (p.598-601) - in which he cites Adam Smith's famous example of the division of labour in the manufacture of pins and cogently argues in favour of the free movement of labour. His evidence is preceded by that of J. R. McCulloch who concluded his evidence (p.592-8) with the statement: “The only principle of permanent price is the quantity of labour required to produce the article in question.” Joseph Hume was appointed chairman of the Select Committee on Artizans and Machinery which began hearings in February 1824. Other members of the committee were Thomas Acland, Frankland Lewis, Peter Moore, and William Huskisson. The committee heard evidence from masters, workers, and other interested persons. The evidence was detailed, providing accounts of strikes and lock-outs, of intimidation and victimisation and the use of combination laws to reduce wages. The need for workmen's associations to help workers resist injustices were recognised and the activities of such associations in Leicester, Liverpool and elsewhere were examined. When all the evidence had been heard, the Committee concluded that the Combination Laws should be repealed and the law preventing artisans from working abroad should be removed. The repeal bills passed both Houses of Parliament in 1824. The issue of allowing the export of machinery was more problematic but eventually that too was allowed. (Book ref. 20510)   £650.00
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DAVIES (Gilbert); RAFFLES, (Thomas S.): ROYAL SOCIETY &c. A collection of 17 pamphlets by Gilbert Davies bound together in contemporary half calf.
PHOTOGRAPHS AND FULL DETAILS SENT ON REQUEST. 17 pamphlets bound together in contemporary half calf, with the bookplate of John Davies Enys [1837-1912, the author's grandson and notable New Zealand naturalist] and later stamp of Cornwall County Record Office on first free endpaper, with a manuscript index on front pastedown. COMPRISING: 1. On the Vibrations of Heavy Bodies [in Cycloidal and in Circular Arches, as Compared with their Descents through Free Space, including an estimate of the variable Circular excess in Vibrations continually Decreasing], first separate edition incorporating the original as it appeared in the Quarterly Journal, vol. XV, preceded by a [new] supplement, 7, 15pp., engraved plate, extending mathematical table, London, Clowes, 1825. Yale, Pennsylvania and The American University in OCLC. O in NSTC. BOUND WITH: 2) On the Properties of the Catenarian Curve with Reference to Bridges by Suspension, in a Letter to the Editor of the Quarterly Journal. 6pp., undated. [1821]. Yale in OCLC. Not in BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 3) On the Ventilation of Rooms, and on the Ascent of Heated Gases through Flues, From the Quarterly Journal No. XXV, [1822] 8pp., with woodcut illustration. Drop-head title. Yale in OCLC. Not in BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 4) On the Regular or Platonic Solids, 4pp [pp. 161-164] from the Philosophical Magazine and Annals, 1828. Yale in OCLC. Not in BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 5) On the General Nature and Advantages of Wheels and Springs for Carriages, the Draft of Cattle and the Form of Roads, 6pp., with integral blank and paper wrappers bound in. London, Clowes, undated. [1825]. Yale in OCLC. Not in BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 6) Notice of the Appearances in the Brain of a Young Female who attained her Seventeenth year without giving Indication of Sensation or Motion from Birth. From the Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, No. 95, 3pp., [1826] Drop-head title. Not in OCLC, BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 7) [Eikon Basilike; letter to a periodical regarding the Greek motto, 4pp., 1823] BOUND WITH: 8) Memoir of Michael de Tregury, Archbishop of Dublin. From Gentleman's Magazine, half title, plate, 8pp., 1821. BOUND WITH: 9) Addresses to the Royal Society at the Anniversary Meeting on St. Andrew's Day 1827 [reviewing that year's achievements], 16pp., with the ownership signature of Catherine Gilbert [daughter] in top margin of title, London, Taylor, 1828. Not in OCLC, BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 10) Addresses to the Royal Society at the Anniversary Meeting on St. Andrew's Day 1828 [reviewing that year's achievements], 11pp., London, Taylor, 1829. Newberry Library in OCLC. Not in BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 11) Addresses to the Royal Society at the Anniversary Meeting on St. Andrew's Day 1829 [reviewing that year's achievements], 16pp., with the ownership signature of John Davies Gilbert [son] in top margin of title, London, Taylor, 1829. Goettingam, American Philosophical Society, Brigham Young University in OCLC. Not in BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 12) Addresses to the Royal Society at the Anniversary Meeting on St. Andrew's Day 1829 [reviewing that year's achievements], 11pp., London, Taylor, 1830. Not in OCLC, BLIC or NSTC. BOUND WITH: 13) A Plain Statement of the Bullion Question in a Letter to a Friend, First Edition, 48pp, title slightly browned, London, Stockdale, 1811. BOUND WITH 14): A Plain Statement of the Bullion Question in a Letter to a Friend, second edition extracted from XXVII of the Pamphleteer, (but not part of the Pamphleteer; a separately issued pamphlet). 37pp plus advertisement leaf, London, 1819. BOUND WITH: 15) Tables for Suspension Bridges. London; W. Nicol. Drop-head title, 7pp. BOUND WITH: 16) Christmas Drama of St. George. From the Gentleman's Magazine, 1830. 2p. BOUND WITH: 17) RAFFLES, (Thomas S.) Memoir on the Tin of the Island of Banka, by the late Sir Thomas Raffles, F.R.S., communicated to the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall by Davies Gilbert, Esq., V[ice] P[resident] R[oyal] S[ociety], [with an introduction by Gilbert] read September 1827, First Edition, 11pp., on heavy high quality paper, Penzance, printed by T. Vigurs, 1827. Not in OCLC, BLIC or NSTC. * Tin from Banka (in the Malayan Peninsula) is known as amongst the purest in the world and this account by Thomas Raffles was printed here for the first time and presented to the Cornish Geological Society by Davies Gilbert who was its President and provided an introduction. It describes its history, economics, mining and processing. Tin is a vital resource to Cornwall, is still mined in the region and was therefore of particular interest to local geologists. *A collection of 17 pamphlets bound together in contemporary half calf. A family collection containing the ownership inscriptions of several members of the Davies family including that of his eldest daughter Catherine, who married John Samuel Enys of Cornwall and acted acted as compositor at Gilbert Davies's private press. * Davies Gilbert (formerly Giddy) (1767-1839), president of the Royal Society. Born in the parish of St. Erth, Cornwall. Educated at Pembroke College Oxford. He joined the Linnean Society and promoted the Geographical Society of Cornwall, founded in 1814. He was a patron and encourager of Sir Humphrey Davy and he assisted Trevethick in his efforts to improve the steam engine. He provided calculations to Thomas Telford in drawing up his plans for the Menai Bridge. From 1804 he acted as an M. P. for Cornwall. By his marriage to the heiress of Thomas Gilbert of Eastbourne he acquired very extensive estates. In 1811 when the high price of gold affected the currency he wrote a pamphlet on the Bullion Question. In 1827 he was elected president of the Royal Society. During his presidency he nominated the authors of the eight Bridgewater Treatises. In 1830 he selected Brunel's design for the Clifton suspension bridge. In 1825 he established a private press in his house at Eastbourne, where his eldest daughter, Catherine, afterwards the wife of John Daniel Enys of Cornwall, acted as compositor. According to DNB "Davies Gilbert's importance to the development of science in the early nineteenth century lay in his faith that science provided the best means to tackle practical problems and in his facility as a parliamentary promoter of scientific ventures." (Book ref. 20514)   £1650.00
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THOMPSON (William): An inquiry into the principles of the distribution of wealth most conducive to human happiness; applied to the newly proposed system of voluntary equality of wealth.
First Edition, xxiv, 600pp tall thick 8vo, modern half calf old style, spine gilt extra, a fine copy. London, Longman, 1824. Photograph available on request. Goldsmiths' 24361; Kress C.1354. A famous description of the natural rights of labour in the evolution of the Industrial Revolution. "Thompson's major work of political economy, An Inquiry into the Principles of the Distribution of Wealth, was published in 1824. In it, Thompson set out the principles which he believed should regulate economic life, namely the free direction of labour, voluntary exchanges and the use of labour of its entire product. These were the 'natural laws' which, if they prevailed, 'would produce much happiness in any community' and it was the purpose of the Inquiry to examine the extent to which they did prevail first, under existing economic arrangements; secondly, in a truly competitive market economy; and thirdly, under a system of mutual co-operation. For Thompson, existing economic arrangements were governed by 'absolute violence, fraud.. the operation of unequal laws interfering with the freedom of labour.. and the perfect freedom of voluntary exchanges'. This resulted in the appropriation of labour's product by 'a class of capitalists, a class of rent or land-owners, and an always imperious class of idlers'. It was these classes who, through the coercive exercise of economic and political power, 'counteract(ed) the natural laws of distribution', 'forcing labour without a satisfactory equivalent'. Yet, as he wrote in the Inquiry "tis by means of the brutal expedients of insecurity.. by the varied employments of force and terror.. that the capitalist is enabled to keep down the remuneration of labour.. The mere competition of producers, if left to the natural laws of distribution.. would be entirely of the exhilarating instead of the depressing species.' It would act 'constantly to raise the remuneration of labour.. while.. at the same time cheapen the articles produced to society at large'. Untrammelled competition would 'banish extremes of wealth and poverty' and society would enjoy 'blessings of equality comparable to those enjoyed under Mr. Owen's system of mutual co-operation by common labour'. But for Thompson this was not sufficient and in the Inquiry he proceeds to press the case for communities of mutual co-operation where all would have an equal right to draw upon the products of co-operative labour and where the voluntary renunciation of personal rights to property would obviate any violation of the principle of security in the products of individual labour. In the Inquiry communities were preferred largely because of their benign social and ethical consequences. Thus Thompson expressed anxiety over the moral tone of a society which 'retain(ed) the principle of selfishness.. as the leading motive to action' and where there was, in consequence, negligible scope for action motivated by benevolence and social concern. Such a society bred antagonism and conflict. The competitive pressures it unleashed threatened its social cohesion and harmony, while the moral corrosion it engendered was revealed in the transmutation of truth, sincerity, benevolence and man himself into marketable commodities. The most powerful initial influence upon Thompson was Benthamite utilitarianism. This is apparent in the Inquiry where Thompson discussed its egalitarian implications and where he considered at length the whole problem of reconciling security with equality. However, the most profound and lasting intellectual influence was that of Owenism, though it should be stressed that Thompson helped to mould Owenite thinking as much as Owenite socialism shaped his own thought. In particular his political or, as Thompson would have preferred it, 'social economy', provided Owenites with a new range of critical tools of analysis with which to condemn the existing order and to sap the ideological defences thrown up by the popularizers of classical economics. His Inquiry was the magnum opus of co-operative political economy.." (Book ref. 19536)   £2000.00
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THOMPSON (William): An Inquiry into the Principles of the Distribution of Wealth most Conducive to Human Happiness.., a new [i.e. second] edition by William Pare,
xxxii, 463pp tall 8vo, original blind decorated gilt lettered cloth, a very good copy partially unopened. London, Orr, 1850. Photograph available on request. Goldsmiths' 37235. Pare's introduction, which is new to the work in this edition, occupies p.vii-xxxii. It provides much of the biographical material that is known about William Thompson. (Book ref. 19537)   £450.00
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TAYLOR (Frederick Winslow): The Principles of Scientific Management,
First Trade Edition, 144pp tall 8vo, a good copy in original cloth, New York, Harper, 1911. Photograph available on request. See Printing and the Mind of Man, #403; "F. W. Taylor, an engineer in the Bethlehem Steel Works in Philadelphia, was the originator of what he called scientific management, now known as time and motion study. His system was based on what he estimated to be a fair day's work and the best means of ensuring such a standard of production. He was interested in any factor that hindered or helped in attaining this end, and besides studying factory conditions and methods in great detail he was responsible for fundamental changes in machinery and machine tools. The main lines of approach to increased efficiency were standardizing processes and machines, time and motion study, and payment by results, all of which have been welcomed in the USSR, where Stakhanovism is virtually Taylorism renamed, and in Germany, where the Principles was translated and achieved a wide circulation (thirty-one thousand copies sold by 1922). The adoption of his methods there contributed notably to the speedy recovery of German production after the First World War." -Printing and the Mind of Man. This is the very first treatise on what is now called time and motion study - a way of systematizing production while controlling costs. From years of observations and study of manufacturing conditions and methods, Taylor evolved a theory that by scientific study of every minute step and operation in a manufacturing plant, data could be obtained as to the fair and reasonable production capacities of both man and machine. The application of such data, he argued, would eventually abolish the antagonisms between employer and employee, and bring about greatly increased efficiency. In addition Taylor worked out a comprehensive system of analysis, classification, and symbolization for use in the study of every type of manufacturing operation. See; Larson, Guide to Business History (1964) 2661. (Book ref. 11910)   £240.00
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TAYLOR (Frederick Winslow): Shop Management, with an Introduction by Henry R. Towne,
First Edition in book form, 207pp 8vo, a very good copy in original cloth, New York, Harper, 1911. Photograph available on request. Along with the Principles of Scientific Management this is Taylor's other seminal publication - taken together they also stand out as his most famous books; of the two this one is far rarer. The present work - the text of which appeared first as a paper for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1903 - firmly establishes scientific management in the workshop. "The conclusions [of this book] constitute in effect the foundations for a new science - ‘The Science of Industrial Management.' As in the case of constructive work the ideal engineer is he who does the best work at the lowest cost, so also, in the case of industrial operations, the best manager is he who organises the forces under his control that each individual shall work at his best efficiency and shall be compensated accordingly. Dr Taylor has demonstrated conclusively that, to accomplish this, it is essential to segregate the planning of the work from its execution; to employ for the former trained experts possessing the right mental equipment, and for the latter men having the right physical equipment for their respective tasks and being receptive of expert guidance in their performance..." -foreword, p.9-10. (Book ref. 18809)   £140.00
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PRAT (S.): The Regulating Silver Coin,
Made Practicable and Easie, to the Government and Subject, by a Lover of his Country, First Edition, 125pp 8vo, modern calf backed boards old style, library withdrawal stamp on title, a good copy, London, Bonwick, 1696. Goldsmith 3331. Kress 1990. Wing P.3184. 'At the time silver coin was scarce in England and was particularly subject to fluctuation in value. Pratt discusses the effect of this scarcity and its relation to hoarding, exportation &c. He claims to provide for both extrinsic and intrinsic values ... and avoids the dilemma most writers on this subject created, i.e. `That either coin must want of its intrinsic value, so as to endanger a fatal stop in trade, or of it is to be made of near an intrinsic value, according to the rate silver shall go in at the time of coining, then upon every little rise of silver higher than that price, we are in danger of having it exported and melted down ...'.' Amex Collection 375. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 3334)   £175.00
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POSTLETHWAYT (Malachy) [SAVARY]: The Universal Dictionary of Trade and Commerce,
translated from the French of the Celebrated Monsieur Savary.. With Large Additions and Improvements, Incorporated Throughout the Whole Work; which more particularly accommodate the same to the Trade and Navigation of these Kingdoms, and the Laws, Customs and Usages to which all Traders are Subject, by Malachy Postlethwayt, second edition, 2 volumes, fine engraved frontispiece to volume one, xxviii, 2, 1018; viii, 856pp very large tall folio, with 24 very fine large folding engraved world maps and 26 large folding tables and charts, contemporary full calf, rehinged with original spine laid down, original labels retained, an excellent copy, London, Knapton, 1757. PHOTOGRAPH AVAILABLE ON REQUEST. Kress 5645. McCulloch p.52 & 61. This edition not in Goldsmith (but see 8594). Second edition of this famous dictionary on eighteenth-century trade and commerce which was first published in 1751-5. Although attributed to Postlethwayt, as stated in the title the work is largely a translation of Jacques Savary des Bruslons' Dictionnaire Universel de Commerce which was published posthumously in 1723 by his brother Louis-Philemon. 'This was the first work of the kind that appeared in modern Europe; and has furnished the principal part of the materials for most of those by which it has been followed' (McCulloch). Postlethwayt (who also wrote several pamphlets on the African trade), wrote on the financial condition of the country from the standpoint of seeking its improvement. He substantially enlarged and improved Savary's dictionary by adding matters relevant to Britain and its Empire and in this form the work met with great success in the commercial world. Postlethwayt died in 1767, by which time three editions of his Dictionary had appeared. THE 24 SUPERB MAPS BY THOMAS KITCHIN and D'ANVILLE comprise 4 of Europe; 4 of North America; 3 of South America; 8 of Asia and 5 of Africa. They are double page or larger (folding). (Book ref. 195)   £3800.00
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PETTY (William, Sir); [GRAUNT, John]: The Economic Writings of Sir William Petty,
together with the Observations upon the Bills of Mortality more probably by Captain John Graunt. Edited by Charles Henry Hull, First Edition thus, 2 volumes, xci, 313; [8], [317-]700pp with some folding facsimiles of handwriting, ALS &c., a very good set in original cloth with the gilt stamp of the New South Wales Library of Parliament on both front boards and very faint stamps on titles, a little spotting, Cambridge, at the University Press, 1899. The first scholarly edition collecting together all of Petty's important writings – along with Graunt's Observations upon the Bills of Mortality (now definitively known to be by Graunt although at one time considered to be by Petty since he fraudulently claimed it to be his own; see Pearson, The History of Statistics, p.17ff). It was Petty who coined the term "political arithmetic" and it was Petty who is credited as the first to formulate a general theory of government founded on concrete empirical knowledge. The present edition of his works includes all the important works including A Treatise of Taxation and Contributions, 1662; The Political Anatomy of Ireland, 1672; Political Arithmetick, 1676; and his Observations Upon the Dublin Bills of Mortality, 1681; – "a path-breaker in demographic analysis" (- Sills, International Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences, Vol 12, p.57). "Petty's analytical skill and his insistence on measurement and his clear schematic view of the economy make him the first econometrician, and he was constantly evolving and using concepts and analytical methods that were in advance of his time.." (op cit p.67). Graunt's work, The Natural and Political Observations of Mortality, of which the fifth edition of 1676 is here reprinted, can be seen, in fact, as being even more important than Petty's. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 15920)   £380.00
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PETTY (William, Sir): Several Essays in Political Arithmetick.., the Fourth Edition, Corrected.
To which are prefix'd Memoirs of the Author's Life, iv, vi, 184pp 8vo, a very good copy in modern half calf, small library stamp on verso of title, London, Browne, 1755. Goldsmith 8998; Kress 5463. This is the first edition to contain the biography. It was Petty who coined the term "political arithmetic" and it was Petty who is credited as the first to formulate a general theory of government founded on concrete empirical knowledge. "Petty's analytical skill and his insistence on measurement and his clear schematic view of the economy make him the first econometrician, and he was constantly evolving and using concepts and analytical methods that were in advance of his time.." ( - Sills, International Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences, Vol 12, p.67). Petty has been called (by Marx, among others), the founder of political economy. In Political Arithmetick he examines the wealth of England by "Observations or positions expressed by number weight and measure," that is, by statistics. It was acknowledged in Petty's own time that he was the inventor of this method of exposition. It ranks as one of his most important books, and a pioneering work in the history of statistics. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 15919)   £425.00
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PETTY (William): Several Essays in Political Arithmetick: The titles of which follow in the ensuing pages.
First Edition, [2],276pp. Contemporary panelled calf, spine and corners neatly restored. An excellent copy. London. Printed for Robert Clavel at the Peacock, and Henry Mortlock at the Phoenix in St. Paul's Church-Yard. ., 1699. Photograph available on request. Wing P 1937. Goldsmiths' P 3571. Kress 2127. Keynes Bibliography of Sir William Petty No 46. An important collection. After a collective title page is found, each with a separate title page, "An Essay concerning the multiplication of mankind and Essay in political arithmetick, concerning the growth of the city of London"; "Further observations upon the Dublin bills"; "Two essays in political arithmetic concerning the people, housing, hospitals of London and Paris"; "Observations upon the cities of London and Rome"; "Five essays in political arithmetick"; "Political arithmetick, or a discourse concerning the extent and value of lands." (Book ref. 19534)   £4500.00
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PETTY (Sir William): A treatise of taxes and contributions. Shewing the nature and measures of Crown Lands, Assessments, Customs, Poll-Moneys, Lotteries, Benevolence, Penalties, Monopolies, Offices, Tythes, Raising of Coins, Harth-Money, Excise, etc.
With several intersperst discourses and digressions concerning Warrs. The Church, Universities, Rents and Purchases, Usury and Exchange, Banks and Lombards, Registries for Conveyances, Beggars, Ensurance, Exportation of money [and] wool, Free-Ports, Coins, Housing, Liberty of Conscience, etc. The same being frequently applied to the present state of affairs of Ireland. Second edition, 4to. [16],72pp. Light soiling to title, slight chipping to edges of first and last leaf. Old round stamp of the Birmingham Law Society on the title page. Excellently rebound in quarter calf, marbled boards. London. Printed for Nath. Brooke at the Angel formerly in Cornhill, now in Gresham College, going into the Exchange from Bishopsgatestreet. ., 1667. Photograph available on request. Keynes Bibliography of Sir William Petty No 9. "This edition was published during Petty's absence in Ireland and was probably unauthorised by him." Wing P1939. Goldsmiths' 1849. Kress 1291. Hollander 131. Massie 825. McCulloch p. 318 (the 1679 edition). Sweet and Maxwell I.,p 331. Amex No 355. "According to McCulloch this is 'one of the most remarkable of the early tracts in any branch of political economy, Petty touches in this treatise on various subjects of great interest and importance, and his remarks are uniformly distinguished by their depth and appropriateness. He has in different parts of this tract indicated, with considerable distinctness, the fundamental principle, by establishing which Mr. Ricardo gave a new aspect to the whole science, that the value of commodities is, speaking generally, determined by the quantities of labour required to produce and bring them to market." (op. cit. p. 318). The Treatise was Petty's first economics treatise and was published in 1662 soon after the Restoration, when changes in the method of raising revenue were being discussed." As is indicated on the title page Petty is at great pains to stress the application of his observations to the state of Ireland. In the Preface, written about the time when as Duke of Ormonde he went to Ireland as Lord Lieutenant; he sets this out in detail. (Book ref. 19535)   £3500.00
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OWEN (Robert): A New View of Society: Or, Essays on the Formation
of the Human Character Preparatory to the Development of A Plan for Gradually Ameliorating the Condition of Mankind. ... Fourth Edition. viii + 176pp royal 8vo, a fine large copy with generous margins, contemporary calf gilt, skilfully rebacked. London: Printed for Longman (&c. &c.), 1818. PHOTOGRAPH AVAILABLE ON REQUEST. ROBERT DALE OWEN'S COPY WITH HIS SIGNATURE ON TITLE PAGE AND THE MID 19th CENTURY OWEN BOOKPLATE. National Library of Wales Catalogue, 5. Harrison p. 272. Kress C. 137. Goldsmiths 22273. See Printing and the Mind of Man, 271.A New View of Society was the first and most important statement of Robert Owen's utopian ideas on the organisation of society. It was first privately published in four parts in 1813-1814 and is a legendary rarity; indeed all early editions are rare.[bound with] OWEN (Robert) An Address Delivered to the Inhabitants of New Lanark, on the First of January, 1816, at the Opening of the Institution Established for the Formation of Character. ... Fourth Edition, 48pp royal 8vo, an excellent large copy, London: printed for Longman (&c &c), 1819. National Library of Wales Catalogue, 9. Harrison p. 266. Kress C. 3 71. Goldsmiths 22702. [bound with] OWEN (Robert) Two Memorials on Behalf of the Working Classes; the First Presented to the Governments of Europe and America, the Second to the Allied Powers Assembled in Congress at Aix-la-Chapelle. 27 + (1)pp royal 8vo, an excellent large copy, London: printed for Longman &c &c), 1818.[bound with] OWEN (Robert) New View of Society. Tracts Relative to this Subject; viz. Proposals for Raising A Colledge of Industry of All Useful Trades and Husbandry. By John Bellers. (Reprinted From the Original, Published in the Year 1696). Report to the Committee of the Association for the Relief of the Manufacturing and Labouring Poor. A Brief Sketch of the Religious Society of People Called Shakers. With An Account of the Public Proceedings Connected with the Subject, Which Took Place in London in July and August 1817, First Collected Edition, (2) + 43 + (1) + 24 + 16 + 83 + (1)pp royal 8vo, with a large folding plate ("A View and Plan of the Agricultural and Manufacturing Villages of Unity and Mutual Co- operation"), the plate and adjacent leaf rather foxed as usual but a very good copy, London: printed for Longman (&c &c), 1818.FIRST COLLECTED EDITION, combining National Library of Wales Catalogue, 11, 15, 142 and 406. Harrison p.272. Goldsmiths 22274. Kress C. 136. FOR A FULL NOTE ON THIS ITEM PLEASE ENQUIRE & IT WILL BE E-MAILED TO YOU (Book ref. 19931)   £3500.00
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MUN (Thomas): England's Treasure by Foreign Trade;
or the Balance of our Foreign Trade is the Rule of Our Treasure, fourth edition, [6], 87, [1]pp 8vo, tiny paper repair to margin of title and repair to foot of last leaf (neither affecting text), a very good copy in later three-quarter red morocco gilt, London, Morphew, 1713. Goldsmith 5034; this edition not in Einaudi, Hanson or Kress. The classic text of English mercantilism, first published posthumously in 1664. PHOTOGRAPH AVAILABLE ON REQUEST. "Mun's book hammered home the significance of the balance of payments equation, with numerous examples to demonstrate the impotence of detailed interventionist policies to hold or attract bullion while trade was in deficit.. Mun may well have been the first to state the celebrated proposition that the current account trade surplus must correspond to the sum of the financial surpluses of the public and private sectors..." -New Palgrave, III, 576. In Mun's view the trading universe was essentially a coherent and mutually supporting community. Too much frugality at home would restrict foreign purchases of English goods. Mun cautioned that any restrictions at home would lead to restrictions introduced abroad. Mun made money the passive servant of commodities, following in the wake of commerce to settle accounts of merchants. Money followed goods, and the exchange rate followed money. Money's command over goods gave it value. Mun had a compelling explanation of the dynamics of growth through commercial expansion. (Book ref. 194)   £500.00
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MALTHUS (Thomas Robert): Principles of Political Economy
considered with a view to their practical application. Second Edition with considerable additions from the Author's own manuscript and an original Memoir. Octavo, quarter calf and marbled boards, spine lettered gilt, livpp + 446pp, leaf edges uncut, London: William Pickering, 1836. IMPORTANT SECOND EDITION, published posthumously, contains considerable additions from the authors own manuscript, and edited by John Cazenove (of whom little is known) and a memoir of Malthus by William Otter which is one of the chief authorities of his life. Kress: C4188. Goldsmith 29340. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 3286)   £575.00
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MACPHERSON (David): Annals of Commerce, Manufactures, Fisheries, and Navigation,
with Brief Notices of the Arts and Sciences Connected with them. Containing the Commercial Transactions of the British Empire and Other Countries.., First Edition, 4 volumes royal quarto, 719; 738; 728; iv, 550 + c.200pp appendix and index, good contemporary half calf, marbled boards, binding skilfully restored, an excellent copy, London, Nichols, 1805. Goldsmith 19000; Kress B.4939. Considered by Williams to be 'important' (I, 386) and by Palgrave (1926) to be 'a leading authority.' The middle two volumes are essentially an edition of Anderson's History of Commerce but the final volume carries the history from 1760 to 1801 - one of the most vital periods of all. 'The book displays much labour and original research, and has been generally accepted as a leading authority on the subjects dealt with, especially in the latter years chronicled'. -Palgrave, II, 661. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 219)   £600.00
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JEVONS (William Stanley): The Theory of Political Economy ... with Notes and an Extension of the Bibliography of Mathematical Economic Writings by H. Stanley Jevons,
fourth edition, lxiv, 339pp tall 8vo, original orange/red cloth, an excellent largely unopened copy, London, Macmillan, 1911. PHOTOGRAPHS SENT ON REQUEST *This edition has a new 5 page introduction by Jevons's son and there are three appendixes that are added here for the first time. The first is the editor's "attempt to elucidate my father's treatment of the theory of interest"; the second is the printing of a fragment of Jevons's MS on Capital and Interest and the third is a reprint of Jevons's first statement of his newly devised mathematical theory of economics. The bibliography is also updated in this edition. Often cited as "the first book of modern economics," Marshall wrote in response to this book that Jevons's economic work, "will probably be found to have more constructive force than any save that of Ricardo that has been done during the last hundred years." This is the book that contains the development of Jevons's major economic idea; the marginal utility concept. "Jevons was very conscious of being a revolutionary attempting to overthrow "the noxious influence of authority" of Mill and Ricardo. The Theory of Political Economy has marked inconclastic flavour and much of it is brilliantly written and full of strikingly original phrases..." - Blaug, Great Economists Before Keynes, p.101. Jevons's contributions to economics came at a time when there was much debate as to the appropriate method and future form of the science. Jevons's views on these points were clear and farsighted. He had no doubt that the deductive method which had served the classical authors so well did not need to be replaced, but rather reformed; and to a large extent that reform would consist in the explicit use of mathematical techniques. In the light of his work on logic and scientific method it was clear to Jevons that Economics belonged to the class of sciences "which besides being logical are also mathematical" "...our science must be mathematical, simply because it deals with quantities". As to the form of the science, he was equally clear "it will no longer be possible to treat political economy as if it were a single undivided and indivisible science". Nevertheless, in whatever ways the subject might become divided and specialized, it would be pervaded by certain general principles. In the Theory of Political Economy Jevons set himself to the investigation of these principles "to the tracing out of the mechanics of self-interest and utility. But he also made substantial contributions to other divisions of the subject especially in the study of movements of price level, the trade cycle, the economics of exhaustible resources and in questions of economic policy and the role of the state. The work of Jevons thus significantly affected both the foundations of economic theory and the superstructure of applied economics.... Jevons himself recognized and understood the relationships between theory and measurement in economics more fully and more deeply than most of his contemporaries. He stressed that to say that economics must be a mathematical science did not imply that it must be an exact science, with accurately measurable data. Mathematical theories could be developed in advance of measurements; but the data were there to be measured and Jevons set an outstanding example in both the painstaking collection and the inspired interpretation of masses of statistical information. He not only recognized the importance for theory of measuring economic quantities, but was among the first to bring out the significance for theory of the concept of the dimensions of such quantities, including notably the time dimension in many aspects of consumption, production and investment." New Palgrave, p.1009. "Jevons's The Theory of Political Economy is the first modern book on economics, it has proved singularly attractive to all bright minds newly attacking the subject; simple, lucid, unfaltering, chiselled in stone where Marshall knits in wool" -Keynes, Essays in Biography, (cit, Black, ed. Jevons, Papers and Correspondence, I, p.48). (Book ref. 20509)   £295.00
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