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BULL (Clarence Sinclair): Pepper, Terence & John Kobal, Text. Foreword by Katharine Hepburn.: The Man Who Shot Garbo, The Hollywood Photographs of Clarence Sinclair Bull.
First UK edition, 4to, 256 pp., b/w and color photographs, original heavy card wrappers, very good copy, London, National Portrait Gallery, 1989. "The Man Who Shot Garbo is a lavish collection of Clarence Sinclair Bull's dazzling work which stands not only as a tribute to the career of an extraordinary photographer, but as one of the most important collections of Hollywood portraiture to be assembed in years." (Book ref. 20405)   £18.00
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BEDE (Cuthbert, pseudonymn of Edward Bradley): Photographic Pleasures Popularly Portrayed with Pen & Pencil,
second edition, 84pp tall octavo (218 x 145mm) with 24 lithographic caricature plates including the additional pictorial title and frontispiece (these additionally printed with sepia), some trivial spotting and foxing (as always with this book), but a very good copy in original blue cloth which repeats the title-page image in gilt (a photographer groaning under the weight of a land camera and tripod beneath a smiling full sun), cloth slight rubbed, all early editions are rare, London: John Camden Hotten, 1859. PHOTOGRAPHS OF THIS BOOK CAN BE SENT ON REQUEST * Rev. Edward Bradley, 1827-1890, comic writer and illustrator, wrote under the pseudonym of "Cuthbert Bede", was educated at Durham University; ordained 1850. He contributed regularly to Punch and other periodicals. His most popular book was The Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green, An Oxford Freshman, illustrated by the author, London, 1853. The present work, Photographic Pleasures, first appeared in book form in 1854 (published by Day & Son), and was re-published the following year by Thomas McLean. Parts of the work first appeared in "Punch". Cuthbert Bede's manuscript reminiscences about the work are quoted in M.H. Spielmann's "History of "Punch" (1895): "Photography being a novelty in 1853, Mark Lemon readily accepted my proposal to introduce it into "Punch," and accordingly, the first four caricature illustrations of photography that appeared were in "Punch" between May and August 1853. One of these [the frontispiece] represented "The Portrait of an Eminent Photographer who has just succeeded in focusing a view to his Complete Satisfaction." He was depicted with his head under the hood, while a bull was charging him in the rear..." THE FIRST SATIRICAL BOOK ON PHOTOGRAPHY. (Book ref. 19929)   £500.00
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CARROLL (Lewis): UNIQUE ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PHOTOGRAPH,
from wet collodion negative of Ella Monier-Williams at the age of 8, full length, seated in corner of Carroll's chaise longue, feet drawn up reading a book. UNIQUE IMAGE. Probably taken May-July 1866, neatly inscribed on the verso in pencil "Ella Bickersteth, Oxford, "I Like Pictures,"" 114 x 140mm. Presented in a wide margined acid-free mount. Photograph available on request. Carroll recorded in his diary on May 1st 1866 his first meeting with the Monier-Williams family and his wish to photograph Ella 'whom I had noticed before'. Mrs Monier-Williams brought her daughter to Carroll's rooms to be photographed on the 24th of that month. The diary records no less than twelve mentions of Ella and a number of photographic sessions; "Mrs Williams brought over the little Ella, of whom I took two excellent negatives" [24 May 1866]; "I have taken.. a good many of their little Ella, of whom I did several pictures with no other dress than a cloth tied round her, savage fashion.." [8 July 1866]. During that first week of July 1866 he also photographed her dressed with ethnographic items from New Zealand he borrowed from the Ashmolean Museum.Ella was one of the charmed circle of favourites to whom Carroll presented an inscribed copy of Alice. Numerous other of his books that were sent to her, along with letters from Carroll, appeared at auction at Phillips, London, in November 1994. Such a stream of presentation copies shows how lasting their friendship was. Ella later reminisced about Carroll: " As a child he gave one the sense of such perfect understanding, and this knowledge of child nature was the same whether the child was only seven years of age, or in her teens. A ‘grown-up' child was his horror A visit to Mr Dodgson's rooms to be photographed was always full of surprises. Although he had quaint fancies in the way he dressed his little sitters, he could never bear a dressed-up child. A ‘natural child' with ruffled untidy hair suited him far better, and he would place her in some ordinary position of daily life, such as sleeping, or reading, and so produce charming pictures... The last time I saw Mr Dodgson, not long before his death, was at the Indian Institute at Oxford, when, full of characteristic teasing, as usual, he tried to prove to me, the mother of six sons, how infinitely superior he considered girls to boys; and that was indeed a settled conviction he was always ready to defend. I little thought that it would be the last time I should meet the man of so gentle and kindly a nature, whose friendship enriched my childhood.." (Letters, ed. Cohen, p195-6).LITERATURE: For Carroll's photographs of Ella see, Wakeling: Register of all Known [Lewis Carroll] Photographs, in: Taylor (Roger) and Wakeling (Edward), Lewis Carroll Photographer, The Princeton University Library Albums, image bracket: 1461-1483.The Illustrated London News for 14 April 1928 printed this photograph along with others as part of an article it published on the sale of the Alice manuscript: "Photographs by the Author of Alice, one of Lewis Carroll's ‘Little Girls'... Since the announcement of the sale of the original MS of ‘Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, " by Lewis Carroll, which fell to an American bidder for £15,400, several ladies who, as little girls, were friends of the author, have recalled memories of him. These photographs, taken by him in his rooms at Christ Church, Oxford, all show Ella Monier-Williams (now Mrs Bickersteth of Canterbury), daughter of the late Sir M. Monier-Williams, Professor of Sanskrit at Oxford. In a recent letter to ‘The Times' Mrs Bickersteth said: "It was over sixty years ago that he used to visit my father. Among my earliest recollections is being taken by my mother to his rooms in Tom Quad at Christ Church, again and again, to be photographed by him in some mood, costume, or attitude which caught his fancy, or in which his discerning eye saw the unconscious expression of childish pleasure, hope or awe. Of these photographs I have a bundle precious to me..."PROVENANCE: This photograph was one of six that together formed item 536 in the Lewis Carroll Centenary in London Exhibition, which took place in London in 1932 where it is described by Falconer Madan, the editor, in the catalogue as: "Six photographs by Dodgson by Miss Ella C. F. Monier-Williams (daughter of Professor Monier-Williams) now Mrs Samuel Bickersteth: in a frame 21¼ x 25½ in. Taken in 1864-5." Lewis Carroll Centenary in London 1932, including a Catalogue of the Exhibition, with Notes; an Essay on Dodgson's Illustrators by Harold Hartley; and additional literary pieces (chiefly unpublished), London, Bumpus, 1932. This was one of two exhibitions held in the centenary year of 1932 (the other was at Columbia University) that were solely devoted to Lewis Carroll and they did a great deal to firmly establish his world-class importance and reputation, stimulating scholarly and biographical interest. AN E MAIL IMAGE OF THIS PHOTOGRAPH CAN BE SENT TO YOU ON REQUEST (Book ref. 19911)   £9500.00
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CARROLL (Lewis): UNIQUE ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PHOTOGRAPH
from wet collodion negative of Ella Monier-Williams at the age of 8, full length, seated on Carroll's chaise longue, leaning on cushion, feet drawn up with book at edge of image. UNIQUE IMAGE, probably taken May-July 1866, inscribed on the verso in pencil "Ella Monier-Williams, Oxford, "Please go On [Reading]"", 105 x 155mm. Presented in a wide margined acid-free mount. Photograph available on request. Carroll recorded in his diary on May 1st 1866 his first meeting with the Monier-Williams family and his wish to photograph Ella 'whom I had noticed before'. Mrs Monier-Williams brought her daughter to Carroll's rooms to be photographed on the 24th of that month. The diary records no less than twelve mentions of Ella and a number of photographic sessions; "Mrs Williams brought over the little Ella, of whom I took two excellent negatives" [24 May 1866]; "I have taken.. a good many of their little Ella, of whom I did several pictures with no other dress than a cloth tied round her, savage fashion.." [8 July 1866]. During that first week of July 1866 he also photographed her dressed with ethnographic items from New Zealand he borrowed from the Ashmolean Museum. The photograph here of her in costume is the one of those Carroll describes in his Diary for July 9th: "Did two large pictures of Ella with New Zealand Cloak etc."Ella was one of the charmed circle of favourites to whom Carroll presented an inscribed copy of Alice. Numerous other of his books that were sent to her, along with letters from Carroll, appeared at auction at Phillips, London, in November 1994. Such a stream of presentation copies shows how lasting their friendship was. Ella later reminisced about Carroll: " As a child he gave one the sense of such perfect understanding, and this knowledge of child nature was the same whether the child was only seven years of age, or in her teens. A ‘grown-up' child was his horror A visit to Mr Dodgson's rooms to be photographed was always full of surprises. Although he had quaint fancies in the way he dressed his little sitters, he could never bear a dressed-up child. A ‘natural child' with ruffled untidy hair suited him far better, and he would place her in some ordinary position of daily life, such as sleeping, or reading, and so produce charming pictures... The last time I saw Mr Dodgson, not long before his death, was at the Indian Institute at Oxford, when, full of characteristic teasing, as usual, he tried to prove to me, the mother of six sons, how infinitely superior he considered girls to boys; and that was indeed a settled conviction he was always ready to defend. I little thought that it would be the last time I should meet the man of so gentle and kindly a nature, whose friendship enriched my childhood.." (Letters, ed. Cohen, p195-6).LITERATURE: For Carroll's photographs of Ella see, Wakeling: Register of all Known [Lewis Carroll] Photographs, in: Taylor (Roger) and Wakeling (Edward), Lewis Carroll Photographer, The Princeton University Library Albums, image bracket: 1461-1483.The Illustrated London News for 14 April 1928 printed this photograph along with others as part of an article it published on the sale of the Alice manuscript: "Photographs by the Author of Alice, one of Lewis Carroll's ‘Little Girls'... Since the announcement of the sale of the original MS of ‘Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, " by Lewis Carroll, which fell to an American bidder for £15,400, several ladies who, as little girls, were freinds of the author, have recalled memories of him. These photographs, taken by him in his rooms at Christ Church, Oxford, all show Ella Monier-Williams (now Mrs Bickersteth of Canterbury), daughter of the late Sir M. Monier-Williams, Professor of Sanskrit at Oxford. In a recent letter to ‘The Times' Mrs Bickersteth said: "It was over sixty years ago that he used to visit my father. Among my earliest recollections is being taken by my mother to his rooms in Tom Quad at Christ Church, again and again, to be photographed by him in some mood, costume, or attitude which caught his fancy, or in which his discerning eye saw the unconscious expression of childish pleasure, hope or awe. Of these photographs I have a bundle precious to me..."PROVENANCE: This photograph was one of six that together formed item 536 in the Lewis Carroll Centenary in London Exhibition, which took place in London in 1932 where it is described by Falconer Madan, the editor, in the catalogue as: "Six photographs by Dodgson by Miss Ella C. F. Monier-Williams (daughter of Professor Monier-Williams) now Mrs Samuel Bickersteth: in a frame 21¼ x 25½ in. Taken in 1864-5." Lewis Carroll Centenary in London 1932, including a Catalogue of the Exhibition, with Notes; an Essay on Dodgson's Illustrators by Harold Hartley; and additional literary pieces (chiefly unpublished), London, Bumpus, 1932. This was one of two exhibitions held in the centenary year of 1932 (the other was at Columbia University) that were solely devoted to Lewis Carroll and they did a great deal to firmly establish his world-class importance and reputation, stimulating scholarly and biographical interest. AN E MAIL IMAGE OF THIS PHOTOGRAPH CAN BE SENT TO YOU ON REQUEST (Book ref. 19867)   £5500.00
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CARROLL (Lewis): UNIQUE ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PHOTOGRAPH
from wet collodion negative of Ella Monier-Williams at the age of 8, full length, wearing New Zealand costume, seated in corner of studio on rug, with bow leaning against the wall, with covered vessel and wooden weapon on floor beside her. The costume she is wearing is still at the Pitt-Rivers Museum and amongst the items that have been identified by the curators are a grass skirt that was brought back from the first voyage to Australia by Captain Cook and a very rare Maori shark tooth knife. Probably taken May-July 1866, neatly inscribed on the verso in ink "Ella Monier-Williams, Oxford, in a New Zealand Dress," 181 x 246mm. Presented in a wide margined acid-free mount. Photograph available on request. Carroll recorded in his diary on May 1st 1866 his first meeting with the Monier-Williams family and his wish to photograph Ella 'whom I had noticed before'. Mrs Monier-Williams brought her daughter to Carroll's rooms to be photographed on the 24th of that month. The diary records no less than twelve mentions of Ella and a number of photographic sessions; "Mrs Williams brought over the little Ella, of whom I took two excellent negatives" [24 May 1866]; "I have taken.. a good many of their little Ella, of whom I did several pictures with no other dress than a cloth tied round her, savage fashion.." [8 July 1866]. During that first week of July 1866 he also photographed her dressed with ethnographic items from New Zealand he borrowed from the Ashmolean Museum. The photograph here of her in costume is the one of those Carroll describes in his Diary for July 9th: "Did two large pictures of Ella with New Zealand Cloak etc."Ella was one of the charmed circle of favourites to whom Carroll presented an inscribed copy of Alice. Numerous other of his books that were sent to her, along with letters from Carroll, appeared at auction at Phillips, London, in November 1994. Such a stream of presentation copies shows how lasting their friendship was. Ella later reminisced about Carroll: " As a child he gave one the sense of such perfect understanding, and this knowledge of child nature was the same whether the child was only seven years of age, or in her teens. A ‘grown-up' child was his horror A visit to Mr Dodgson's rooms to be photographed was always full of surprises. Although he had quaint fancies in the way he dressed his little sitters, he could never bear a dressed-up child. A ‘natural child' with ruffled untidy hair suited him far better, and he would place her in some ordinary position of daily life, such as sleeping, or reading, and so produce charming pictures... The last time I saw Mr Dodgson, not long before his death, was at the Indian Institute at Oxford, when, full of characteristic teasing, as usual, he tried to prove to me, the mother of six sons, how infinitely superior he considered girls to boys; and that was indeed a settled conviction he was always ready to defend. I little thought that it would be the last time I should meet the man of so gentle and kindly a nature, whose friendship enriched my childhood.." (Letters, ed. Cohen, p195-6).LITERATURE: For Carroll's photographs of Ella see, Wakeling: Register of all Known [Lewis Carroll] Photographs, in: Taylor (Roger) and Wakeling (Edward), Lewis Carroll Photographer, The Princeton University Library Albums, image bracket: 1461-1483.The Illustrated London News for 14 April 1928 printed this photograph along with others as part of an article it published on the sale of the Alice manuscript: "Photographs by the Author of Alice, one of Lewis Carroll's ‘Little Girls'... Since the announcement of the sale of the original MS of ‘Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, " by Lewis Carroll, which fell to an American bidder for £15,400, several ladies who, as little girls, were freinds of the author, have recalled memories of him. These photographs, taken by him in his rooms at Christ Church, Oxford, all show Ella Monier-Williams (now Mrs Bickersteth of Canterbury), daughter of the late Sir M. Monier-Williams, Professor of Sanskrit at Oxford. In a recent letter to ‘The Times' Mrs Bickersteth said: "It was over sixty years ago that he used to visit my father. Among my earliest recollections is being taken by my mother to his rooms in Tom Quad at Christ Church, again and again, to be photographed by him in some mood, costume, or attitude which caught his fancy, or in which his discerning eye saw the unconscious expression of chilish pleasure, hope or awe. Of these photographs I have a bundle precious to me..."PROVENANCE: This photograph was one of six that together formed item 536 in the Lewis Carroll Centenary in London Exhibition, which took place in London in 1932 where it is described by Falconer Madan, the editor, in the catalogue as: "Six photographs by Dodgson by Miss Ella C. F. Monier-Williams (daughter of Professor Monier-Williams) now Mrs Samuel Bickersteth: in a frame 21¼ x 25½ in. Taken in 1864-5." Lewis Carroll Centenary in London 1932, including a Catalogue of the Exhibition, with Notes; an Essay on Dodgson's Illustrators by Harold Hartley; and additional literary pieces (chiefly unpublished), London, Bumpus, 1932. This was one of two exhibitions held in the centenary year of 1932 (the other was at Columbia University) that were solely devoted to Lewis Carroll and they did a great deal to firmly establish his world-class importance and reputation, stimulating scholarly and biographical interest. AN E MAIL IMAGE OF THIS PHOTOGRAPH CAN BE SENT TO YOU ON REQUEST (Book ref. 19866)   £6500.00
Offered for sale by Jeffrey Stern Antiquarian Bookseller   Order / enquire about this book
CARROLL (Lewis): UNIQUE ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PHOTOGRAPH
from wet collodion negative of Ella Monier-Williams at the age of 8, full length leaning on the arm of Carroll's chaise longue, feet crossed at ankles on Turkish rug. UNIQUE IMAGE, probably taken May-July 1866, inscribed on the verso in pencil "Ella Monier-Williams, Oxford, "Living in Alice's World,"" 161 x 210mm. Presented in wide margined acid-free mount. Photograph available on request. Carroll recorded in his diary on May 1st 1866 his first meeting with the Monier-Williams family and his wish to photograph Ella 'whom I had noticed before'. Mrs Monier-Williams brought her daughter to Carroll's rooms to be photographed on the 24th of that month. The diary records no less than twelve mentions of Ella and a number of photographic sessions; "Mrs Williams brought over the little Ella, of whom I took two excellent negatives" [24 May 1866]; "I have taken.. a good many of their little Ella, of whom I did several pictures with no other dress than a cloth tied round her, savage fashion.." [8 July 1866]. During that first week of July 1866 he also photographed her dressed with ethnographic items from New Zealand he borrowed from the Ashmolean Museum. Ella was one of the charmed circle of favourites to whom Carroll presented an inscribed copy of Alice. Numerous other of his books that were sent to her, along with letters from Carroll, appeared at auction at Phillips, London, in November 1994. Such a stream of presentation copies shows how lasting their friendship was. Ella later reminisced about Carroll: " As a child he gave one the sense of such perfect understanding, and this knowledge of child nature was the same whether the child was only seven years of age, or in her teens. A ‘grown-up' child was his horror A visit to Mr Dodgson's rooms to be photographed was always full of surprises. Although he had quaint fancies in the way he dressed his little sitters, he could never bear a dressed-up child. A ‘natural child' with ruffled untidy hair suited him far better, and he would place her in some ordinary position of daily life, such as sleeping, or reading, and so produce charming pictures... The last time I saw Mr Dodgson, not long before his death, was at the Indian Institute at Oxford, when, full of characteristic teasing, as usual, he tried to prove to me, the mother of six sons, how infinitely superior he considered girls to boys; and that was indeed a settled conviction he was always ready to defend. I little thought that it would be the last time I should meet the man of so gentle and kindly a nature, whose friendship enriched my childhood.." (Letters, ed. Cohen, p195-6).LITERATURE: For Carroll's photographs of Ella see, Wakeling: Register of all Known [Lewis Carroll] Photographs, in: Taylor (Roger) and Wakeling (Edward), Lewis Carroll Photographer, The Princeton University Library Albums, image bracket: 1461-1483.The Illustrated London News for 14 April 1928 printed this photograph along with others as part of an article it published on the sale of the Alice manuscript: "Photographs by the Author of Alice, one of Lewis Carroll's ‘Little Girls'... Since the announcement of the sale of the original MS of ‘Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, " by Lewis Carroll, which fell to an American bidder for £15,400, several ladies who, as little girls, were freinds of the author, have recalled memories of him. These photographs, taken by him in his rooms at Christ Church, Oxford, all show Ella Monier-Williams (now Mrs Bickersteth of Canterbury), daughter of the late Sir M. Monier-Williams, Professor of Sanskrit at Oxford. In a recent letter to ‘The Times' Mrs Bickersteth said: "It was over sixty years ago that he used to visit my father. Among my earliest recollections is being taken by my mother to his rooms in Tom Quad at Christ Church, again and again, to be photographed by him in some mood, costume, or attitude which caught his fancy, or in which his discerning eye saw the unconscious expression of chilish pleasure, hope or awe. Of these photographs I have a bundle precious to me..."PROVENANCE: This photograph was one of six that together formed item 536 in the Lewis Carroll Centenary in London Exhibition, which took place in London in 1932 where it is described by Falconer Madan, the editor, in the catalogue as: "Six photographs by Dodgson by Miss Ella C. F. Monier-Williams (daughter of Professor Monier-Williams) now Mrs Samuel Bickersteth: in a frame 21¼ x 25½ in. Taken in 1864-5." Lewis Carroll Centenary in London 1932, including a Catalogue of the Exhibition, with Notes; an Essay on Dodgson's Illustrators by Harold Hartley; and additional literary pieces (chiefly unpublished), London, Bumpus, 1932. This was one of two exhibitions held in the centenary year of 1932 (the other was at Columbia University) that were solely devoted to Lewis Carroll and they did a great deal to firmly establish his world-class importance and reputation, stimulating scholarly and biographical interest. AN E MAIL IMAGE OF THIS PHOTOGRAPH CAN BE SENT TO YOU ON REQUEST (Book ref. 19865)   £6500.00
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CARROLL (Lewis): ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH of: Beatrice Sheward Hatch (1866-1947) and Ethel Charlotte Hatch (1869-1975) as beggar children,
this photograph was taken by Dodgson between 19 and 30 April 1872, and is image number 2025 in Edward Wakeling's list of Carroll photographs. 105mm x 165mm mounted on card (this chipped at corners), inscribed by Beatrice Hatch on verso and on the card margin beneath the photograph "Beggar Children, Beatrice and Ethel Hatch", with a light date stamp at edge of image. The "Beggar Child" was one of Carroll's favourite motifs - it was most famously used in his celebrated portrait of Alice Liddell. This photograph is reproduced by Morton Cohen in his edition of Letters, opposite p.252. There are two other known original images of this photograph: (a) loose print at Texas (Gernsheim Collection) (b) loose print at the Rosenbach Museum, Philadelphia A PHOTOGRAPHIC FILE OF THIS ITEM CAN BE SENT ON REQUEST (Book ref. 19913)   £2200.00
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CARROLL (Lewis): ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PHOTOGRAPH,
from wet collodion negative of Ella Monier-Williams at the age of 8, Ella in a nightdress posed as if sleeping, ONE OF THREE KNOWN COPIES (others in J. A. Lindseth Collection, (USA) cut longer and shorter; another copy in private UK collection). Probably taken May-July 1866, neatly inscribed on the verso in pencil "Ella Monier-Williams, Oxford, "Dreaming of Alice,"" 228 x 140mm. Presented in wide margined acid-free mount. Photograph available on request. Carroll recorded in his diary on May 1st 1866 his first meeting with the Monier-Williams family and his wish to photograph Ella 'whom I had noticed before'. Mrs Monier-Williams brought her daughter to Carroll's rooms to be photographed on the 24th of that month. The diary records no less than twelve mentions of Ella and a number of photographic sessions; "Mrs Williams brought over the little Ella, of whom I took two excellent negatives" [24 May 1866]; "I have taken.. a good many of their little Ella, of whom I did several pictures with no other dress than a cloth tied round her, savage fashion.." [8 July 1866]. During that first week of July 1866 he also photographed her dressed with ethnographic items from New Zealand he borrowed from the Ashmolean Museum.Ella was one of the charmed circle of favourites to whom Carroll presented an inscribed copy of Alice. Numerous other of his books that were sent to her, along with letters from Carroll, appeared at auction at Phillips, London, in November 1994. Such a stream of presentation copies shows how lasting their friendship was. Ella later reminisced about Carroll: " As a child he gave one the sense of such perfect understanding, and this knowledge of child nature was the same whether the child was only seven years of age, or in her teens. A ‘grown-up' child was his horror A visit to Mr Dodgson's rooms to be photographed was always full of surprises. Although he had quaint fancies in the way he dressed his little sitters, he could never bear a dressed-up child. A ‘natural child' with ruffled untidy hair suited him far better, and he would place her in some ordinary position of daily life, such as sleeping, or reading, and so produce charming pictures... The last time I saw Mr Dodgson, not long before his death, was at the Indian Institute at Oxford, when, full of characteristic teasing, as usual, he tried to prove to me, the mother of six sons, how infinitely superior he considered girls to boys; and that was indeed a settled conviction he was always ready to defend. I little thought that it would be the last time I should meet the man of so gentle and kindly a nature, whose friendship enriched my childhood.." (Letters, ed. Cohen, p195-6).LITERATURE: For Carroll's photographs of Ella see, Wakeling: Register of all Known [Lewis Carroll] Photographs, in: Taylor (Roger) and Wakeling (Edward), Lewis Carroll Photographer, The Princeton University Library Albums, image bracket: 1461-1483.The Illustrated London News for 14 April 1928 printed this photograph along with others as part of an article it published on the sale of the Alice manuscript: "Photographs by the Author of Alice, one of Lewis Carroll's ‘Little Girls'... Since the announcement of the sale of the original MS of ‘Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, " by Lewis Carroll, which fell to an American bidder for £15,400, several ladies who, as little girls, were freinds of the author, have recalled memories of him. These photographs, taken by him in his rooms at Christ Church, Oxford, all show Ella Monier-Williams (now Mrs Bickersteth of Canterbury), daughter of the late Sir M. Monier-Williams, Professor of Sanskrit at Oxford. In a recent letter to ‘The Times' Mrs Bickersteth said: "It was over sixty years ago that he used to visit my father. Among my earliest recollections is being taken by my mother to his rooms in Tom Quad at Christ Church, again and again, to be photographed by him in some mood, costume, or attitude which caught his fancy, or in which his discerning eye saw the unconscious expression of childish pleasure, hope or awe. Of these photographs I have a bundle precious to me..."PROVENANCE: This photograph was one of six that together formed item 536 in the Lewis Carroll Centenary in London Exhibition, which took place in London in 1932 where it is described by Falconer Madan, the editor, in the catalogue as: "Six photographs by Dodgson by Miss Ella C. F. Monier-Williams (daughter of Professor Monier-Williams) now Mrs Samuel Bickersteth: in a frame 21¼ x 25½ in. Taken in 1864-5." Lewis Carroll Centenary in London 1932, including a Catalogue of the Exhibition, with Notes; an Essay on Dodgson's Illustrators by Harold Hartley; and additional literary pieces (chiefly unpublished), London, Bumpus, 1932. This was one of two exhibitions held in the centenary year of 1932 (the other was at Columbia University) that were solely devoted to Lewis Carroll and they did a great deal to firmly establish his world-class importance and reputation, stimulating scholarly and biographical interest. AN E MAIL IMAGE OF THIS PHOTOGRAPH CAN BE SENT TO YOU ON REQUEST (Book ref. 19864)   £11500.00
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CARROLL (Lewis): ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PHOTOGRAPH from wet collodion negative
of Ella Monier-Williams at the age of 8, probably taken May-July 1866, ONE OF TWO KNOWN COPIES, inscribed on the verso in pencil "Ready for a Walk with Mr Dodgson, Oxford", the subject full length, standing as a soldier, carrying a stick as a rifle, by studio window on Turkish rug. The image within dark circle caused by lens cap (this cropped out in the only other known copy which is at Princeton), 150mm x 185mm. Presented in a wide margined acid-free mount. Photograph available on request. Carroll recorded in his diary on May 1st 1866 his first meeting with the Monier-Williams family and his wish to photograph Ella 'whom I had noticed before'. Mrs Monier-Williams brought her daughter to Carroll's rooms to be photographed on the 24th of that month. The diary records no less than twelve mentions of Ella and a number of photographic sessions; "Mrs Williams brought over the little Ella, of whom I took two excellent negatives" [24 May 1866]; "I have taken.. a good many of their little Ella, of whom I did several pictures with no other dress than a cloth tied round her, savage fashion.." [8 July 1866]. During that first week of July 1866 he also photographed her dressed with ethnographic items from New Zealand he borrowed from the Ashmolean Museum. Ella was one of the charmed circle of favourites to whom Carroll presented an inscribed copy of Alice. Numerous other of his books that were sent to her, along with letters from Carroll, appeared at auction at Phillips, London, in November 1994. Such a stream of presentation copies shows how lasting their friendship was. Ella later reminisced about Carroll: "As a child he gave one the sense of such perfect understanding, and this knowledge of child nature was the same whether the child was only seven years of age, or in her teens. A ‘grown-up' child was his horror A visit to Mr Dodgson's rooms to be photographed was always full of surprises. Although he had quaint fancies in the way he dressed his little sitters, he could never bear a dressed-up child. A ‘natural child' with ruffled untidy hair suited him far better, and he would place her in some ordinary position of daily life, such as sleeping, or reading, and so produce charming pictures... The last time I saw Mr Dodgson, not long before his death, was at the Indian Institute at Oxford, when, full of characteristic teasing, as usual, he tried to prove to me, the mother of six sons, how infinitely superior he considered girls to boys; and that was indeed a settled conviction he was always ready to defend. I little thought that it would be the last time I should meet the man of so gentle and kindly a nature, whose friendship enriched my childhood.." (Letters, ed. Cohen, p195-6).LITERATURE:For Carroll's photographs of Ella see, Wakeling: Register of all Known [Lewis Carroll] Photographs, in: Taylor (Roger) and Wakeling (Edward), Lewis Carroll Photographer, The Princeton University Library Albums, image bracket: 1461-1483.illustrated: Helmut Gernsheim, Lewis Carroll Photographer, (1949), pl. 59. and Cohen's Reflections in a Looking Glass, page 79 (this example with arch-shaped top - c.50% of the image cropped out in comparison with the present example).The Illustrated London News for 14 April 1928 printed this photograph along with others as part of an article it published on the sale of the Alice manuscript: "Photographs by the Author of Alice, one of Lewis Carroll's ‘Little Girls'... Since the announcement of the sale of the original MS of ‘Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, " by Lewis Carroll, which fell to an American bidder for £15,400, several ladies who, as little girls, were freinds of the author, have recalled memories of him. These photographs, taken by him in his rooms at Christ Church, Oxford, all show Ella Monier-Williams (now Mrs Bickersteth of Canterbury), daughter of the late Sir M. Monier-Williams, Professor of Sanskrit at Oxford. In a recent letter to ‘The Times' Mrs Bickersteth said: "It was over sixty years ago that he used to visit my father. Among my earliest recollections is being taken by my mother to his rooms in Tom Quad at Christ Church, again and again, to be photographed by him in some mood, costume, or attitude which caught his fancy, or in which his discerning eye saw the unconscious expression of chilish pleasure, hope or awe. Of these photographs I have a bundle precious to me..."PROVENANCEThis photograph was one of six that together formed item 536 in the Lewis Carroll Centenary in London Exhibition, which took place in London in 1932 where it is described by Falconer Madan, the editor, in the catalogue as: "Six photographs by Dodgson by Miss Ella C. F. Monier-Williams (daughter of Professor Monier-Williams) now Mrs Samuel Bickersteth: in a frame 21¼ x 25½ in. Taken in 1864-5." Lewis Carroll Centenary in London 1932, including a Catalogue of the Exhibition, with Notes; an Essay on Dodgson's Illustrators by Harold Hartley; and additional literary pieces (chiefly unpublished), London, Bumpus, 1932. This was one of two exhibitions held in the centenary year of 1932 (the other was at Columbia University) that were solely devoted to Lewis Carroll and they did a great deal to firmly establish his world-class importance and reputation, stimulating scholarly and biographical interest. AN E MAIL IMAGE OF THIS PHOTOGRAPH CAN BE SENT TO YOU ON REQUEST (Book ref. 19863)   £6500.00
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CARROLL (Lewis): FINE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH OF XIE KITCHIN
IN WHITE HAT AND COAT, as "Dane", albumen print, sepia, 102mm x 141mm mounted on card 108mm x 163mm with Carroll's own identification number 2132 in his manuscript in purple ink on verso. A very good example, c.1873. Photograph available on request. See CARROLL'S JOURNAL ENTRY: "Photographed Xie in winter dress (Danish), in red petticoat, and in Greek dress." May 14, 1873. See LETTER: from Carroll to Mrs Kitchin: "[Christ Church, Oxford] Saturday [? May 17, 1873] Dear Mrs Kitchin, Here are prints of the Danish dress and the red petticoat. I am taking the negatives with me, and will get a light print done of the Dane for you to get tinted for the Princess. Oh that it would only suggest to her the idea of sitting herself! That has been for years my great ambition in life, which, once accomplished, I should thence-forward look with scorn on Xie and all un-royal subjects for the camera! Gratefully yours, C.L. Dodgson".Lewis Carroll was not simply the author of the world's most famous books for children and an important mathematician whose work was well ahead of its time, but he was also an important pioneer photographer of considerable accomplishment. His photographs, particularly of children, show Carroll at his most sentimental; even, for some of his modern audience, in a interesting erotic light. Carroll abandoned photography in 1880. (Book ref. 19862)   £7000.00
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CARROLL (Lewis): 6 ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS BY CARROLL in The Henry Benyon Crichton Photograph Album of 54 photographs.
This album of 54 early photographs includes six that are definitively known to be by Carroll, one that is "almost certainly" by Carroll, two that are "probably" by Carroll and five that are "possibly" by Carroll - this according to Edward Wakeling (co-author of Lewis Carroll Photographer) who prepared a report on this album in 2003. FULL DETAILS & PHOTOGRAPHIC FILES CAN BE SENT ON REQUEST. The six confirmed Carroll photographs are: 1) Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-1898), assisted self portrait, taken on 2 June 1857 taken in the Deanery garden, Christ Church, image number 235. “Carroll was assisted in this self portrait by Lorina Liddell. He noted in his Journal for 2nd June 1857: “To try the lens, I took a picture of myself for which Ina took off the cap, and of course considered it all her doing!” Taylor and Wakeling, p.177. This example has been trimmed to make a head-and-shoulders image. There are four other known original images of this photograph. 2) Osborne Gordon (1813-1883), MA Christ Church, taken by Carroll on either 3 or 4 July 1860, image number 595. “Gordon was Senior Censor, Reader in Greek and Rhetoric at Christ Church. There are two other known original images of this photograph. 3) Edward Stokes (1823-1863), MA Christ Church, taken by Carroll in June 1857, image number 217. There are three other known original images of this photograph. 4) Thomas Jones Prout (1823-1909), MA Christ Church, taken by Carroll in June 1857, image number 238. There are three other known original images of this photograph. 5) Thomas Vere Bayne (1829-1908), MA Christ Church, taken by Carroll during the spring of 1857, image number 181. Bayne was a lifelong friend of Carroll’s. There are three other known original images of this photograph. 6) Charles Carr Clerke (1799-1877), DD Christ Church, taken by Carroll during the spring of 1857, image number 180. Clerke was Sub-Dean at Christ Church (1852) and chaplain to the Bishop of Winchester 1869-73. There is one other known original image of this photograph.FULL DETAILS OF ALL THE 54 PHOTOGRAPHS IN THE ALBUM CAN BE SENT ON REQUEST. (Book ref. 19914)   £16500.00
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WEDGEWOOD: METEYARD (Eliza): Wedgwood and His Works:
a Selection of His Plaques, Camoes, Medallions, Vases, Etc. , From the Designs of Flaxman and Others. Reproduced in Permanent Photography By the Autotype Process, First Edition, large folio, complete with 68 pages of text and with a further 38 pages, each of these with several mounted photographic plates and unpaginated descriptive letterpress of each one, original brown cloth with mounted photograph in centre of front board, binding professionally repaired (as is always necessary with this book because of the original binding method), neat library stamp on verso title and an old library bookplate, a little spotting on some plates but over all a very good copy of a rare book, London, Bell, 1873. Of great interest because of the use of actual mounted photographs to record the productions from Wedgwood's pioneering factory. Thomas Wedgwood (third son of Josiah, the pottery manufacturer) was himself known as "the first photographer" (see DNB). "The first recorded attempts to produce photographic images were made by Thomas Wedwood at the end of the eighteenth century. From a letter written by James Watt we can presume that he was carrying out his experiments in 1799, but the only details of his work which were published appeared in a paper published by Sir Humphry Davy in 1802. Wedwood, using silver salts, was able to produce visible photographic images by placing objects upon sensitised materials. He found that his surfaces were too insensitive to produce images in the camera. He was unable to fix the images and was unable to view them in daylight. No example of his work remains." - From Today Painting is Dead - The Beginnings of Photography, Victorian and Albert Museum, catalogue, 1972. It is fitting therefore, that this present book is one of the earlier examples of photographic illustration, and certainly one of the most elaborate. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 13845)   £250.00
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St JOSEPH (J. K. S.): The Uses of Air Photography, Nature and Man in a New Perspective,
First Edition, 166pp oblong large slim folio, with numerous plates and illustrations, a few library stamps but a very good copy in original cloth, with dust-wrapper, London, Baker, 1966. (Book ref. 5429)   £24.00
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SANDER (AUGUST): Menschen Des 20. Jahrhunderts Portraitphotographien 1892-1952.
Text by Ulrich Keller. 560pp., 431 portrait photographs. The single greatest achievement in photographic portraiture in the 20th century, presented in sections as originally intended by Sander, including the section on "Jewish Victims of Nazi Persecution". First edition in this format, very large quarto, library stamp verso title page, a very good copy in original cloth with dust-wrapper, Munich, Shirmer/Mosel, 1980. (Book ref. 14040)   £120.00
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POLLACK (Peter): The Picture History of Photography, from the earliest Beginnings to the Present Day,
revised and enlarged edition, 708pp royal square folio, with numerous plates and illustrations, a very good copy in original cloth, with dust-wrapper, New York, Abrams, 1969 (Book ref. 10432)   £20.00
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PHOTOGRAPHY: DAGUERREOTYPE: Half-length double portrait of two seated male friends,
consisting; an older man with a waist length beard with his hand on the shoulder of a younger man (also with full beard but of more usual proportions), both men in frock coats, the younger with waistcoat, wing collar and checked cravat. Glass daguerreotype with elaborate gilt surround in typical velvet lined leather case with original brass catch, the lids of the box with impressed oval flower motif in fine grained red leather (slightly scuffed), 80mm x 95mm, in very good condition, c1845-50. A fine early double portrait of two males; such portraits are rare. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 12390)   £45.00
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PHOTOGRAPHY: ABNEY (W. de W.): Thebes and its Five Greater Temples,
First Edition, 88pp with 40 fine mounted photographs in dark sepia, 6 plans (these - only - slightly marked by a waterstain line about one third up the page), slight very occasional foxing, all edges original gilt, modern three-quarter red fine grained morocco antique style, with raised bands and blind tooled centres, gilt lettered and ruled, red cloth boards, large quarto, very good copy, London, Sampson Low &c., 1876. The large Woodburytype photographs (c.15 x 20cm) are remarkable for their sharp definition, extensive depth-of- field and excellent condition. The author relates how his original mission in Egypt was as a member of a scientific party sent out to photograph the transit of Venus. the "stay was necessarily one of comparatively long duration, and in the intervals of leisure, excursions were made to the different places of interest with which we were surrounded. The camera was a never-failing source of amusement to all, and the sun pictures obtained in a climate which at that time of year was very oppressive, whiled away many an hour which might have been less profitably spent. The apology that the Author has to offer for publishing these sun pictures is that, perhaps, some who have visited the Theban ground may like to recall the scenes which must have impressed them with wonderment, and that to others to whom Egypt is a terra incognita, may gain an idea, though of necessity imperfect, of the marvellous architectural creations of a race whose early history is as yet shrouded in obscurity...." Abney was recognised both as the inventor of gelatino-chloride paper, as well as for his aesthetic approach. See The Truthful Lens, A survey of the photographically illustrated book, 1844-1914. p.185. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 13911)   £1800.00
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PHOTOGRAPHY EGYPT, [early vintage]; BEATO, BONFILS and others: early photographs of EGYPT
An attractive group of 15 original photographs of Egypt contemporaneously mounted on 8 card sheets (recto and verso), each photograph measuring approximately 260 x 205mm c.1870-90, COMPRISING: 1) Temple at Luxor (view across the Nile with ships in foreground). 2) BEATO (A.) Camel with young camel driver before palm trees. 3) Karnak Village, view across river with 8 Egyptians grouped with two donkeys beneath palm trees. 4) BEATO(A.) Buffalo driver with young boy riding, beneath palm trees at Karnak. 5) BEATO (A.) Karnak, main Temple with massive columns, with four Egyptians and two donkeys posed beneath. 6) Karnak showing carved pillars with lotus and papyrus. 7) BEATO (A.) Karnak, "La Salle Hypostyle" with robed Egyptian at foot. 8) BEATO (A.) Medinet Haboo, Thebes, second court from the eastern side, with two large family groups of Egyptians seated. 9) BONFILS "Grande Pyramids de Cheops" with a group of 4 camel riders and four other Egyptians in foreground. 10) ZANGAKI; fine Cairo street scene with two donkey riders, children and others beneath shuttered hanging windows [tiny corner of photograph torn away]. 11) "Colosses de Memmon" with Egyptian and donkey standing at foot 12) Valley of the Kings, view across the Nile with a large sailing ship with two triangular sails in foreground. 13) Two heavily robed Egyptian women with large water vessels balanced on heads. 14) BEATO (A) Medinet Hababoo, Thebes, first courtyard, south-west corner, with two Egyptians. 15) BONFILS: two heavily veiled and robed Egyptian women, numbered in the print 512. This is an impressive suite of early photographs of Egypt by BEATO, BONFILS and others. PHOTOGRAPHS OF ANY OF THESE IMAGES CAN BE SENT TO YOU BY E-MAIL ON REQUEST. (Book ref. 13841)   £270.00
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PASOLINI (Giuseppe): Memoir of Count Giuseppe Pasolini,
late President of the Senate of Italy, compiled by his son, translated.. by the Dowager Countess of Dalhousie, mounted albumen photograph as frontispiece portrait, 442pp large octavo, a few library marks but a good copy in original cloth, head of spine a litle worn, London, Longmans, 1885. (Book ref. 15560)   £22.00
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MOORE (Thomas): Ghost and Shadow Towns of the Glory Road, a Photographic Quest,
First Edition, 191pp folio, library stamp on title, a very good copy in original cloth, plates, with dust-wrapper, South Brunswick, Barnes, 1970. (Book ref. 441)   £6.00
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