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SHENFIELD (B. E.): Social Policies for Old Age.
A Review of Social Provision for old Age in Great Britain, First Edition, viii, 236pp 8vo, original cloth, good, International Library of Sociology and Social Reconstruction, London, Routledge, 1957. (Book ref. 20759)   £15.00
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SHANAS (E.); TOWNSEND (Peter, and others): Old People in Three Industrial Societies,
First Edition, x, vi, 478pp royal octavo, good copy, original cloth, with dust-wrapper, London, Routledge, 1968. "This cross-national study is a work of major importance to social gerontology and comparative sociology. It describes the present capacities of the elderly populations of Denmark, Britain and the United States in relation to their economic and social circumstances and provides a comprehensive account of the elderly and their problems.." -dustwrapper. (Book ref. 20755)   £18.00
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ROWNTREE (B. Seebohm) and LAVERS (G. R.): Poverty and the Welfare State. A Third Social Survey of York
Dealing only with Economic Questions, First Edition, vi, 104pp 8vo, a good copy in original cloth, London, Longmans, 1951. The third sequel to the pioneering 1901 Poverty, and Rowntree's final publication. This was restricted to an examination of the extent to which poverty in York had been reduced by the operations of the various social services. (Book ref. 20758)   £12.00
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ROWNTREE (B. Seebohm): Poverty. A Study of Town Life.
4th edition, xxi, 426pp plus 4pp advertisements at the end, 8vo, with 14 maps, photographs and diagrams, spine slightly faded but a very good copy in original black lettered red cloth, London, Macmillan, 1902. (Book ref. 20753)   £38.00
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ROWNTREE (B. Seebohm): Poverty and Progress. A Second Social Survey of York,
First Edition, xx, 540pp folio, diagrams and illustrations, an excellent copy, original cloth, with dust wrapper, London, Longmans, 1941. This is Rowntree's follow-up survey of York after his survey of 1901 and is particularly valuable in that it quantifies the changes that occurred between the surveys. "This book is intended to help those interested in social well-being to measure the degree in which a typical provincial city has benefited from the efforts put forth during this century to improve social conditions.." -introduction. (Book ref. 20757)   £50.00
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PHILLIPSON (Chris): Capitalism and the Construction of Old Age, Critical Texts in Social Work and the Welfare State,
First Edition, 188pp tall octavo, a very good copy in original paperback, London, Macmillan, 1982. "The book examines the state policies towards the elderly and exposes the failure of post-war reforms in such areas as pensions, medical care and residential provision. It examines the implications of an aging population for social workers and doctors and challenges the conservatism and disinterest shown towards the elderly by members of these groups; medical and welfare workers, it argues, are trapped by models of ageing which over-emphasise deterioration and loss of function and under-emphasise the possibilities for growth and development on old age. The book concludes with a consideration of the likelihood of greater involvement by the elderly in political campaigns both at local and national level and a consideration of the possibilities and problems in developing a social policy responsive to their needs." - note on back cover. (Book ref. 20787)   £12.00
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MARSHALL (Alfred); BOOTH (Charles, witnesses, with others): Report of the Committee appointed by the Treasury to inquire into certain questions connected with the taking of The Census,
with Minutes of Evidence and Appendices, and a Copy of the Treasury Minute Appointing the Committee, Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of Her Majesty, First Edition, xv, 126pp tall folio, modern blue card wrappers with paper label, a good copy, rare, London, for His Majesty's Stationery Office by Eyre and Spottiswoode, [Command 6071], 1890. PHOTOGRAPH SENT ON REQUEST. *Not in Keynes. Marshall's evidence (which follows that of CHARLES BOOTH's on p.56-60) is on p.60-68 and is largely concerned with the use and interpretation of statistics and is particularly critical of the quality of the national statistics that had been gathered on industry and occupation. Marshall forcefully argues that depth and accuracy are essential achievements for a modern industrial census, and that without this economic progress will be severely jeopardised. His evidence closes with the following example: "I wish again to insist that at present the census affords no help whatsoever, absolutely none, towards finding out whether there is an increase in skilled labour, relative to unskilled. Everybody is writing about it, everybody is guessing, nobody knows, because the only people who could find out [the census takers] refuse to do so." (Book ref. 20742)   £150.00
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HOBMAN (D. L.): The Welfare State,
First Edition, 127pp small octavo, good copy in original cloth, London, Murray, 1953. Includes a chapter on National Insurance, describing Beveridge's key role in the development of the British system. (Book ref. 20754)   £16.00
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DRAKE (Joseph T.): The Aged in American Society,
First Edition, ix+ [i]+ 431pp octavo, very good copy in original cloth, New York, Ronald Press Co. [1958]. One of the first university text-books on the subject; "The increase both in number and proportion of the population 65 years of age and over during the past half century has not been matched by the growth of scientific knowledge of this segment of society. Although some studies pertaining to gerontology were made prior to World War II, most of the scientifically oriented research has only been conducted since that time.. The purpose of this book is tow bring together information and data from many sources on all the pertinent aspects of gerontology.." -preface. (Book ref. 20750)   £16.00
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BRIGGS (Asa); ROWNTREE (B. S.): Social Thought and Social Action, a Study of the Work of Seebohm Rowntree 1871-1954,
First Edition, x, 371pp 8vo, a few library stamps (none on title page) a very good copy in original cloth, with dust-wrapper (this a little worn), London, Longmans, 1961. (Book ref. 20752)   £18.00
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BOOTH (William); [with W. T. Stead]: In Darkest England and the Way Out.
First Edition, large octavo, an excellent copy in original gilt lettered cloth, with a large folding frontispiece in colour, 285, xxxi.pp., with 6pp publishers' adverts at end, London: International Headquarters of the Salvation Army, [1890]. PHOTOGRAPH SENT ON REQUEST. "William Booth started life as a pawnbroker's assistant in Nottingham. After coming to London in 1849 he became an itinerant revivalist preacher. In 1865 he started a Christian Mission in Whitechapel. In 1878 he founded almost by accident the Salvation Army. His passionate preoccupation with the submerged tenth [i.e. those in destitution and poverty] was not confined to their spiritual welfare; he was determined to relieve their physical misery as well. In 1890, the same year that Stanley published In Darkest Africa, Booth published In Darkest England. In this book, he analysed the causes of pauperism and vice of the period, and proposed a remedy by ten expedients. These included land settlement, emigration, rescue work among prostitutes and at the prison-gate, the poor man's bank, and the poor man's lawyer. Money was liberally subscribed and a large part of the scheme was carried out.." Printing and the Mind of Man, 373. In the first chapter, Booth famously drew the parallel between the enslavement which Stanley had reported from the Congo jungle and the present state of England: 'As there is a darkest Africa is there not also a darkest England? Civilisation, which can breed its own barbarians, does it not also breed its own pygmies? May we not find a parallel at our own doors, and discover within a stone's throw of our cathedrals and palaces similar horrors to those which Stanley has found existing in the great Equatorial forest.' The entire vision is illustrated in the colour-printed chart, in the form of a bird's eye view of England with the routes leading out of despair shown as roads and railways. The publication of In Darkest England resulted in liberal subscription to Booth's cause to fight poverty and provided the base upon which the Salvation Army was built: a world-wide philanthropic charitable organization complete with military ranks and uniforms: an organization which has earned virtually universal respect and affection. (Book ref. 20761)   £75.00
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BAHR (Stephen J.); PETERSON (Evan T.): Aging and the Family,
2nd printing, 317pp royal octavo, a few library stamps but title-page clean and unstamped, a very good copy in original boards, free front endpaper removed, New York, Lexington Books, 1989. (Book ref. 20748)   £10.00
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ENGELS (Frederick): The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844, with [new] Preface Written in 1892,
translated by Florence Kelley Wischenewetzky, first London edition, xix, 298, [2], + 4pp advertisements, octavo, a very good clean copy in original black lettered red cloth, London, Swan Sonnenschein, 1892. * The Condition of the Working Class is Engels best-known work and in many ways still the best study of the working class in Victorian England. It was also Engels's first book, written during his stay in Manchester from 1842 to 1844. Manchester was then at the very heart of the Industrial Revolution and Engels compiled his study from his own observations and detailed contemporary reports. The fluency of his writing, the personal nature of his insights, and his talent for mordant satire combine to make this account of the life of the victims of early industrial change into a classic - a historical study that parallels and complements the fictional works of the time by such writers as Gaskell and Dickens. What Cobbett had done for agricultural poverty in his Rural Rides, Engels did - and more - in this work on the plight of the industrial workers in the England of the early 1840s. Engels paints an unforgettable picture of daily life in the new industrial towns, and for miners and agricultural workers in a savage indictment of the greed of the bourgeoisie. His later preface, written for this first English edition of 1892 brought the story up-to-date in the light of forty years' further reflection. (Book ref. 20521)   £100.00
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DAVENANT, Charles: An Essay on the Probable Methods of making a People Gainers in the Balance of Trade.
Treating of these heads, viz. Of the People of England. Of the Land of England and its product. Of our Payments to the Publick, and in what Manner the Ballance of Trade may be thereby affected. That a Country cannot increase in Wealth and Power but by Private Men doing their Duty to the Publick, and but by a steady course of Honesty and Wisdom, in such as are Trusted with the Administration of Affairs. First Edition, 16, 312pp, 6 folding tables, 8vo, a fine copy in contemporary ruled calf, leather label, London, Knapton, 1699.THE STARTING POINT FOR POPULATION DISCUSSION. Wing D.309. Kress 2114. Goldsmith 3580. THERE IS A FULL NOTE ON THIS BOOK AVAILABLE, GIVING DETAILS OF ITS HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE. PLEASE ENQUIRE AND IT WILL BE SENT TO YOU BY E-MAIL. Photograph available on request. (Book ref. 2760)   £2800.00
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[BRITISH PARLIAMENTARY PAPERS] NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE:: [BRITISH PARLIAMENTARY PAPERS] NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE: Report of the Departmental Committee on Sickness Benefit Claims under the National Insurance Act,
NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE: National Health Insurance. Report of the Departmental Committee on Sickness Benefit Claims under the National Insurance Act, vii, 87pp., very good copy in original blue printed wrappers, London, His Majesty's Stationery Office, Command 7687, 1914. with: Appendix to the Report of the Departmental Committee on Sickness Benefit Claims under the National Insurance Act, Minutes of Evidence, Volume I, (with: Volume II, and Volume III, and Volume IV (Index), iv, 449; iv, 498; iv, 424; iv, 100pp., folio, all very good copies in original blue printed wrappers, front wrapper to Vol IV a little soiled and with repaired lower corner, London, His Majesty's Stationery Office, Command 7688, 7689, 7690, 7691. 1914. * An investigation of the early form of National Insurance which still relied on privately run societies (effectively variations of the old Friendly Societies). The Commission was charged: 'To enquire into and report upon the alleged excessive claims upon and allowances by approved societies in England in respect of sickness benefit, and any special circumstances which may cause any such claims or allowances.' The Committee found that the machinery was working as smoothly as could have been expected, and there was little evidence of fraud or malingering. The 2,608 societies approved varied from great centralized societies and affiliated orders with hundreds of thousands of members to small local clubs. Some were highly centralized, in others the efficiency depended on local administration. The membership of some was a representative sample of the insured population, of others a selected group which might have specially bad health risks. Many of them had given medical certificates not justified by the circumstances. This had been due partly to uncertainty as to whether 'incapacity to work' meant inability to follow the usual occupation, included convalescence, etc., and partly to a desire to do the best for the patient irrespective of incapacity, as well as to a desire to win the goodwill of patients etc. Some millions of the insured persons had already been insured through the friendly societies, and despite the provisions of Section 72 of the Act, large numbers had continued to contribute to the private friendly society side as well as the 'approved' side, and for many the combined private and state benefit was near, or at, full wages. The Committee found that the uncertainty of the meaning of incapacity for work had led both to the admission of improper and refusal of proper claims, and should be replaced by a statutory definition to mean incapacity by disease or bodily or mental disablement from following the usual employment. The scale of benefits often made it an advantage to badly paid women to declare on the funds, a situation which could be remedied only by improvement in their economic conditions. Uniform rules should be made to determine the nature of the household work permissible during the receipt of benefit. There were doubts, which led to great variety of practice, as to whether both women incapacitated by pregnancy and those by pregnancy with other sickness were entitled to benefit. Some societies excluded both, and some women exposed themselves to risk by continuing to work when they should not do so. There should be a new benefit for pregnant women in respect of the last four weeks of pregnancy, financed by a Treasury grant. Inexperience in conducting women's insurance and an under-estimate of the incidence of illness had led to a general excess of claims, which could not be met either by raising contributions or by reducing benefit. A portion of the sums now going to the redemption of reserve values should be diverted to the societies for this purpose. The defects in medical certification should be remedied by greater precision, rigid dating, a clearer understanding by doctors and societies of their respective duties, and by insured persons of their obligation to furnish all necessary information. (Book ref. 20508)   £250.00
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FRAZER (Sir James George): The Golden Bough, A Study in Magic and Religion,
complete set of the very extensively expanded and definitive third edition in 12 volumes royal octavo, all very fine copies in original cloth. PHOTOGRAPHS AVAILABLE ON REQUEST. comprising: - The Magic Art & the Evolution of Kings (in 2 volumes, 1932); Baldur the Beautiful: the Fire Festivals of Europe & the Doctrine of the External Soul (in 2 volumes, 1930); Spirits of the Corn & of the Wild (in 2 volumes, 1933); Adonis Attis Osiris: Studies in the History of Oriental Religion (2 vols, 1927); The Dying God (1930); Taboo & the Perils of the Soul (1927); The Scapegoat (1933); Bibliography & General Index (1935), complete in 12 vols, original fine grained green cloth with elaborate mistletoe motif blocked on the front boards, top edges gilt, a remarkably excellent clean set, London, Macmillan, 1927 -35. *See Printing & the Mind of Man 374. The Golden Bough first appeared in 1890 in a two-volume edition but was twice revised and expanded, the third and final edition originally appearing in twelve volumes in 1911-15. The present set constitutes later impressions of that great edition which is the best both textually and physically - since all later editions were printed on ever-inferior and thinner paper and with inferior cheap cloth bindings. "Sir James George Frazer originally set out to discover the origins of one ancient custom in Classical Rome - the plucking of the Golden Bough from a tree in the sacred grove of Diana, and the murderous succession of the priesthood there - and was led by his investigations into a twenty-five year study of primitive customs, superstitions, magic and myth throughout the world. The monumental work which resulted has been a rich source of anthropological material and a literary masterpiece for nearly a century." (Book ref. 20470)   £480.00
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BEVERIDGE (William Henry): Social Insurance and Allied Services. Report by Sir William Beveridge. Presented to Parliament by command of His Majesty,
[Cmd. 6404]. 8vo., 299 + (1)pp., original stapled printed wrappers, London: H.M.S.O., 1942. [with] Social Insurance and Allied Services, Memoranda from Organisations. Appendix G to Report by Sir William Beveridge. Presented to Parliament by command of His Majesty November 1942. [Cmd. 6405]. 8vo., iii + (i) + 244pp., original stapled printed wrappers, London: H.M.S.O., 1942. The rare complete work - with the very important appendix that is often missing. The blueprint for the post-war state. 'In 1941 Beveridge was appointed chairman of the Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services. This was in fact a one-man operation; the civil servants on the committee were no more than investigators who took instructions from the chairman. The following year brought the result of the committee's work, the Beveridge Report, which was an instant popular success and carried the name of Beveridge to millions, in and out of the armed services. ... The report contributed in no small degree to the Labour party's victory in 1945, after which it was implemented by the Labour government's social legislation'. [IESS] The Report was 'To undertake, with special reference to the inter-relation of the schemes, a survey of the existing national schemes of social insurance and allied services, including workmen's compensation, and to make recommendations.' (Book ref. 20434)   £220.00
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ASHTON (D. N.): Unemployment under Capitalism. The Sociology of British and American Labour Markets,
First Edition, 225pp tall octavo, a very good copy in original paperback, Brighton, Harvester Books, 1986. (Book ref. 20453)   £15.00
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HOBSON (J. A.): A COLLECTION of 94 titles, by and about Hobson, including two annotated books from his library and an inscribed copy of his rare first book presented to the economist Philip Henry Wickstead
J. A. HOBSON, 1858-1940. THIS COLLECTION INCLUDES ALL HIS MAJOR WORK IN FIRST AND EARLY EDITIONS and is supplemented by contemporary and modern studies of him and his work. FULL DETAILS AND PHOTOGRAPHS AVAILABLE ON REQUEST. "[Hobson].. a major originator of British welfare thought" -Freeden. "Mr Hobson has flung himself with unflagging ardour and courage against the ranks of orthodoxy... The publication of [his book] The Physiology of Industry, 1889, the first and most significant of many volumes, marks, in a sense, an epoch in economic thought..." - John Maynard Keynes in The General Theory. "I am ashamed how blind I was for many years to your essential contention as to the insufficiency of effective demand..." Keynes writing to Hobson, 14 February 1936. "In Hobson's apprehension [his] whole scheme of thought... was designed to be for the present day in some modest degree what The Wealth of Nations was for its day. It was to undercut the intellectual foundations of a socially wasteful economic policy, and to substitute the basis of a new plan designed to harmonize economic interests and maximize economic welfare... It may fairly be ranked among the more important contributions to economic thought during the present century..." - Homan, Contemporary Economic Thought, p.374. "For me at any rate, what is commonly known as the Keynesian revolution was far more the Hobsonian revolution in economic and social thought..." -G. D. H. Cole [quoted by Clarke in Hobson and Keynes as Economic Heretics]. "Hobson became an economist because he was already a social reformer, seeking a solution to the problem of poverty; and when he had become an economist in this way it became imperative for him to fit his economics into the wider structure of his Liberal philosophy..." -G. D. H. Cole. "J. A. Hobson... an acute and original thinker" - R. H. Tawney"Hobson conveys... a general vision of the scope and nature of economics which is both distinctive and coherent" -The New Palgrave"Hobson was by far the most original and penetrating of the new liberal thinkers at the turn of the century and deserves far greater credit as an outstanding social thinker." -J. K. Galbraith, The Age of Uncertainty, p.55. "[Hobson was] a major originator of British welfare thought, a progressive thinker whose influence in a variety of fields has only properly been identified over the past twenty years." - Freeden, Reappraising J. A. Hobson, Humanism and Welfare, p.1 (Book ref. 20140)   £7500.00
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PARLIAMENT: BRITISH PARLIAMENTARY PAPERS: POPULATION: IRISH UNIVERSITY PRESS: POPULATION
25 volumes large folio. FURTHER DETAILS OF CONTENTS & PHOTOGRAPHS AVAILABLE ON REQUEST. Includes: The Comparative Account of 1831 (which summarises the findings of the first four censuses); the complete census Reports of Great Britain for 1841, 1851, 1871 and 1891; the General reports of England and Wales for 1861 and 1881, with, additionally, material on the Irish Censuses - a truly monumental source for research. * There are approximately 5,000 British Parliamentary Papers for the period 1800 to 1900 - a mountain of source material that, however, because of its traditional chronological arrangement, has been difficult to access. The Irish University Press programme of facsimile reprints of these papers overcame this by commissioning academic specialists to select the most important papers and group them on the principle of 32 subject sets in the folio size of the originals. This series was published c.1960-1972. All the volumes are strongly bound in the publisher's original half green morocco leather with the exception of 4 volumes which are bound in the publisher's matching green buckram. They are designed to outlast generations of heavy use and wear and have the great advantage over the original printings because on a strong laid acid free paper. Reproductions of original maps and other illustrations are included throughout the series. Each volume now offered has neat library stamp on front endpaper and verso title, otherwise entirely unmarked and in excellent condition. (Book ref. 20090)   £1000.00
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