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Steve Hare/Parade Books

Charles Seymour Jr. Sculpture in Italy 1400–1500
Penguin, 1966. First edition in the Pelican History of Art series, numbered Z26. This series was the second massive undertaking that Nikolaus Pevsner undertook for Penguin; alongside the Buildings of England series that he largely also wrote, the King Penguin series which he edited, alongside various other writing and lecturing duties. The series was originally presented as hardbound volumes with dustwrappers and slipcases. Later they were republished as large-format paperbacks with integrated texts. These early volumes retain the separate plate section. This book was priced at 5 guineas in 1966, a substantial sum equating perhaps to a quarter of the average workers take-home weekly pay. This copy is in excellent condition and comes with both wrapper and slipcase. The case has slight edge rubbing; the wrapper has some very minor creasing around the edges. This is a weighty volume; 1.7kg before any wrapping is considered. (Book ref. HAR6286) £15.00
Jules Verne Around the World in Eighty Days
Penguin, 2009. First and only edition thus: B format Penguin 'Celebrations' edition. Penguin brought out a set of 36 Celebrations, in this format in 2007. The series was then extended by books being issued for one day only with copy of The Times to readers fortunate enough to live within the M25; the rest of the country just got their paper. Each week different subseries were issued; Romance, Science, Crime, Oscars – and Adventure. This book appeared in the first batch, which were general titles, and not specifically themed, for one day on 21 July 2009. This, therefore, is a first edition 'thus', used specifically and uniquely for the promotion, which is 'Times' branded on the spine and rear cover. There are a few tiny marks on the cover, otherwise the condition is near fine. The publishing history suggests that this is the second impression of the 2008 Red Classics edition. The publishing history, of course, is inaccurate in this case. See http://www.penguincollectorssociety.org/articles/penguin-celebrations--a-checklist for further information (Book ref. HAR6285) £5.00
Geoffrey Chaucer The Canterbury Tales
Penguin, 2009. First and only edition thus: B format Penguin 'Celebrations' edition. Penguin brought out a set of 36 Celebrations, in this format in 2007. The series was then extended by books being issued for one day only with copy of The Times to readers fortunate enough to live within the M25; the rest of the country just got their paper. Each week different subseries were issued; Romance, Science, Crime, Oscars – and Humour. This book appeared in the first batch, which were general titles, and not specifically themed, for one day only during the week commencing 10 August 2009. This, therefore, is a first edition 'thus', used specifically and uniquely for the promotion, which is 'Times' branded on the spine and rear cover. There are a few tiny marks on the cover, otherwise the condition is near fine. See http://www.penguincollectorssociety.org/articles/penguin-celebrations--a-checklist for further information (Book ref. HAR6284) £5.00
John Gribbin Deep Simplicity
Penguin, 2009. First and only edition thus: B format Penguin 'Celebrations' edition. Penguin brought out a set of 36 Celebrations, in this format in 2007. The series was then extended by books being issued for one day only with copy of The Times to readers fortunate enough to live within the M25; the rest of the country just got their paper. Each week different subseries were issued; Romance, Humour, Crime, Oscars – and Science. This book appeared in the first batch, which were general titles, and not specifically themed, for one day only on 3 November 2009. This, therefore, is a first edition 'thus', used specifically and uniquely for the promotion, which is 'Times' branded on the spine and rear cover. Condition is largely as new. See http://www.penguincollectorssociety.org/articles/penguin-celebrations--a-checklist for further information (Book ref. HAR6283) £4.00
Frederick Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth Wolfbane
Penguin, 1967 First edition Penguin Science Fiction title in the main series numbered 2561. Condition is excellent: few faults. Cover design not credited. For further information of the design of Penguin science fiction covers, see http://www.penguinsciencefiction.org/ (Book ref. HAR6282) £5.00
Georges Simenon Stranger in the House
Penguin, 1967 First edition Penguin in an 'orange' for general fiction cover, numbered 2732 in the main series. Front cover design based on stills from the film starring James Mason, Geraldine Chaplin and Bobby Darin. The book is a little tired and grubby and is rubbed. (Book ref. HAR0804) £4.00
Maurice Sendak Where the Wild Things Are
The Bodley Head, 1967. First UK edition hardbound children's illustrated story, with colour illustrations throughout. No dustwrapper. Not ex library; no inscriptions. Slight wear, and some minor grubby marks on the front cover. The beginnings of a split at the base of the spine; but otherwise an excellent examples of a children's story now incredibly almost 50 years old. Note - scan is slightly undersized. (Book ref. HAR6281) £15.00
James Reeves, Edward Ardizzone The Lion that Flew
Chatto & Windus, 1974. First edition hardbound children's illustrated story, with colour wash and black and white drawings by Ardizzone throughout. No dustwrapper (probably as issued). Not ex library; no inscriptions. Slight wear, and a small damp stain on the outer edge of the text pages. Otherwise a pretty good example of a pretty good book. ISBN 0 7011 5040 8 (Book ref. HAR6280) £12.00
Alan Cash (ed.) The Daily Telegraph Tenth Crossword Book
Penguin, c.1990. Reprint edition Penguin, number 2726 in the main series, but now only apparent as ISBN 0 14 0023726 2. Condition is excellent; near fine. Initially bought in error from another online book dealer unable to distinguish between a first paperback edition and its 20th reprint. (Book ref. HAR6279) £4.00
Malcolm Lowry Hear us O Lord from Heaven thy Dwelling Place
Penguin, 1969. First edition Penguin in the main series, numbered 2959. Cover illustration by George Tute. Condition is generally sound; the spine is slightly creased and there is minor wear. (Book ref. HAR6278) £4.00
J. Sheridan Le Fanu Uncle Silas
Penguin, 1945. First edition (thus) and rather rare Penguin; not the usual UK edition, but a wartime Australian version. During WWII it soon became uneconomical, and probably frowned upon to export Penguins to the colonies and English-speaking markets in bulk. The loss of a cargo ship might also mean the loss of 50,000 or so books of Penguin's stock. In the USA, under Ian Ballantine, the solution was devised not simply to reprint books, but to commission new ones, and design and print them locally. In Australia the printing industry was slightly less developed, and Penguin got no further than allowing some 70 existing titles to be reset and printed in Australia, in conjunction with the Lothian company. Lothian Penguins are understandably rare now, and of course few found their way to the UK. They are soon distinguishable from the (admittedly poorly produced) UK wartime Penguins. They are pretty shabby, poorly set, and use the minimum paper. They also sport some rather odd adverts: "Dandruff is dangerous"... This copy has (probably literally) been through the wars. Its covers are all there, but the spine has suffered quite badly and lacks all but an inch. The covers are ragged at the edges, and mottled, as are several pages. A delicate and rare volume– but rather special all the same. (Book ref. HAR6276) £8.00
Margery Allingham The Case of the Late Pig
Penguin, 1944. First edition (thus) and rather rare Penguin; not the usual UK edition, but a wartime Australian version. During WWII it soon became uneconomical, and probably frowned upon to export Penguins to the colonies and English-speaking markets in bulk. The loss of a cargo ship might also mean the loss of 50,000 or so books of Penguin's stock. In the USA, under Ian Ballantine, the solution was devised not simply to reprint books, but to commission new ones, and design and print them locally. In Australia the printing industry was slightly less developed, and Penguin got no further than allowing some 70 existing titles to be reset and printed in Australia, in conjunction with the Lothian company. Lothian Penguins are understandably rare now, and of course few found their way to the UK. They are soon distinguishable from the (admittedly poorly produced) UK wartime Penguins. They are pretty shabby, poorly set, and use the minimum paper. They also sport some rather odd adverts: "Dandruff is dangerous"... This copy boasts an ad offering a cure for 'puffy ankles, and the rather wonderful piece of copywriting that would cause ASA heads to explode: 'Craven A: made specially to prevent sore throats'. This copy has (probably literally) been through the wars. Its covers are all there, but the spine has suffered quite badly and lacks the bottom inch. A bit grubby and fragile – but rather special all the same. (Book ref. HAR6275) £10.00
Jonathan Black The Face of Courage: Eric Kennington, Portraiture and the Second World War
Philip Wilson, 2011. Large-format paperback art book produced to accompany the exhibition at the Royal Air force Museum. ISBN 978-0-85667-705-2. Condition is new. Priced new at £19.99. (Book ref. HAR6274) £12.00
Malerie Marder Carnal Knowledge
Violette Editions, 2011. Large-format hardbound art book; primarily nude photographs. Edited and produced by Robert Violette. Preface by Gregory Crewdson; Introduction by Charlotte Cotton. Photographs by Malerie Marder, also with Philip-Lorca di Corcia, and occasional texts. Published price is £50. Condition is new. This is a large and weighty book; postage will be charged at cost. (Book ref. HAR6273) £25.00
Stephen Crane The Red Badge of Courage
Penguin, 1942. During WWII it soon became uneconomical, and probably frowned upon to export Penguins to the colonies and English-speaking markets in bulk. The loss of a cargo ship might also mean the loss of 50,000 or so books of Penguin's stock. In the USA, under Ian Ballantine, the solution was devised not simply to reprint books, but to commission new ones, and design and print them locally. In Australia the printing industry was slightly less developed, and Penguin got no further than allowing some 70 existing titles to be reset and printed in Australia, in conjunction with the Lothian company. Lothian Penguins are understandably rare now, and of course few found their way to the UK. They are immediately distinguishable from the (admittedly poorly produced) UK wartime Penguins. They are pretty shabby, poorly set, and use the minimum paper. They also sport some rather odd adverts: "Dandruff is dangerous"... This is an early Lothian edition, in typical condition:the spine and cover edges are strengthened by sellotape. Now rare in Australia, these books rarely find their way to the UK. (Book ref. HAR6272) £12.00
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Night Flight
Penguin, 1943 During WWII it soon became uneconomical, and probably frowned upon to export Penguins to the colonies and English-speaking markets in bulk. The loss of a cargo ship might also mean the loss of 50,000 or so books of Penguin's stock. In the USA, under Ian Ballantine, the solution was devised not simply to reprint books, but to commission new ones, and design and print them locally. In Australia the printing industry was slightly less developed, and Penguin got no further than allowing some 70 existing titles to be reset and printed in Australia, in conjunction with the Lothian company. Lothian Penguins are understandably rare now, and of course few found their way to the UK. They are immediately distinguishable from the (admittedly poorly produced) UK wartime Penguins. They are pretty shabby, poorly set, and use the minimum paper. They also sport some rather odd adverts: "Dandruff is dangerous"... This is an early Lothian edition, in typical condition:the spine and cover edges are strengthened by sellotape. Now rare in Australia, these books rarely find their way to the UK. (Book ref. HAR6271) £10.00
Pierre Clostermann The Big Show
Penguin, 1958. First edition fiction title in Penguin's main series, numbered 1284. By the late 1950s Penguin were experiencing serious rivalry from other publishers, and notably Pan, who, from the start had published books with full colour illustrations on the covers. Penguin had stuck to what they knew best; generally avoiding the popular end of the market, and war yarns in particular, and keeping to typographic covers, arguing that the Penguin brand was so well known, that it sold better than any illustration. But times were changing; television was making readers more visually aware, and Penguins were beginning to look dated. So in 1957 it was decided to try a small experiment, but to confine it to the more popular end of the fiction they published. Abram Games was engaged as art director, and indeed produced the artwork for several of the titles published in this guise. The experiment was decreed a failure – as was largely inevitable; the books were launched with no fanfare and little publicity, and bookshops, who at this time still kept Penguins and other paperbacks in separate rooms, were unsure as to which room these belonged in. It is a shame; the quality of design and illustration in uniformly excellent in these books, and they deserved better. Cover illustration by David Caplan. Condition of this copy is very good; slight crease to the cover and some splitting along the spine edge. (Book ref. HAR6270) £4.00
Gabriel Chevalier Clochemerle-Babylon
Penguin, 1958. First edition fiction title in Penguin's main series, numbered 1275. By the late 1950s Penguin were experiencing serious rivalry from other publishers, and notably Pan, who, from the start had published books with full colour illustrations on the covers. Penguin had stuck to what they knew best; generally avoiding the popular end of the market, and war yarns in particular, and keeping to typographic covers, arguing that the Penguin brand was so well known, that it sold better than any illustration. But times were changing; television was making readers more visually aware, and Penguins were beginning to look dated. So in 1957 it was decided to try a small experiment, but to confine it to the more popular end of the fiction they published. Abram Games was engaged as art director, and indeed produced the artwork for several of the titles published in this guise. The experiment was decreed a failure – as was largely inevitable; the books were launched with no fanfare and little publicity, and bookshops, who at this time still kept Penguins and other paperbacks in separate rooms, were unsure as to which room these belonged in. It is a shame; the quality of design and illustration in uniformly excellent in these books, and they deserved better. Cover illustration by Abram Games. Condition of this copy is very good; slight crease to the cover. (Book ref. HAR6269) £5.00
H.E. Bates My Uncle Silas
Penguin, 1958. First edition fiction title in Penguin's main series, numbered 1265. By the late 1950s Penguin were experiencing serious rivalry from other publishers, and notably Pan, who, from the start had published books with full colour illustrations on the covers. Penguin had stuck to what they knew best; generally avoiding the popular end of the market, and war yarns in particular, and keeping to typographic covers, arguing that the Penguin brand was so well known, that it sold better than any illustration. But times were changing; television was making readers more visually aware, and Penguins were beginning to look dated. So in 1957 it was decided to try a small experiment, but to confine it to the more popular end of the fiction they published. Abram Games was engaged as art director, and indeed produced the artwork for several of the titles published in this guise. The experiment was decreed a failure – as was largely inevitable; the books were launched with no fanfare and little publicity, and bookshops, who at this time still kept Penguins and other paperbacks in separate rooms, were unsure as to which room these belonged in. It is a shame; the quality of design and illustration in uniformly excellent in these books, and they deserved better. Abram Games claimed that this was not one of the small series that he art directed; nevertheless, it clearly follows the pattern of the others. Cover illustration by Edward Ardizzone - who also contributed black and white illustrations to the text. Condition of this copy is very good; slight creasing to the spine. (Book ref. HAR6268) £5.00
Zane Grey Tappan's Burro
Penguin, 1958. First edition fiction title in Penguin's main series, numbered 1277. By the late 1950s Penguin were experiencing serious rivalry from other publishers, and notably Pan, who, from the start had published books with full colour illustrations on the covers. Penguin had stuck to what they knew best; generally avoiding the popular end of the market, and war yarns in particular, and keeping to typographic covers, arguing that the Penguin brand was so well known, that it sold better than any illustration. But times were changing; television was making readers more visually aware, and Penguins were beginning to look dated. So in 1957 it was decided to try a small experiment, but to confine it to the more popular end of the fiction they published. Abram Games was engaged as art director, and indeed produced the artwork for several of the titles published in this guise. The experiment was decreed a failure – as was largely inevitable; the books were launched with no fanfare and little publicity, and bookshops, who at this time still kept Penguins and other paperbacks in separate rooms, were unsure as to which room these belonged in. It is a shame; the quality of design and illustration in uniformly excellent in these books, and they deserved better. Cover illustration by Dennis Bailey. Condition of this copy is good; creasing to the covers. (Book ref. HAR6267) £4.00